The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963

Notes and Documents

ters," Southwestern Historical Quarterly, XLIX, 424; Crocket, Two
Centuries in East Texas, 95.
Andrew Robinson was living in Mississippi in about 1841, and may
have been the Aroberson who was ordered out of Nacogdoches by the
Spanish for smuggling in 18o3. He returned to Texas in 1821 and
settled in Brazoria County in 1824. Foote, Texas and the Texans, I,
186n; Hatcher, Opening of Texas to Foreign Settlement, z80o-z82z,
p. 58; J. H. Kuykendall, "Reminiscences of Early Texans," Quarterly
of the Texas State Historical Association, VII, 29; Bugbee, "The Old
Three Hundred," ibid., I, 110o.
Rollins was the father of Charles Rollins. Gulick and others, Lamar
Papers, IV, Pt. 1, 281.
Charles Rollins was the half-breed son of a member of the Expedi-
tion. He took over command of the Indians when their chief was
killed in the Battle of Rosalis. Ibid.
Reuben Ross-see note 32.
Scott-see note 48.
William Slocum took an escort to Nacogdoches to bring Toledo to
San Antonio to replace Gutierrez. He commanded a company in the
Battle of Alazan, and was reported as missing after the Battle of the
Medina. Sibley to Armstrong, June 1o, 1813, Garrett, "Sibley Letters,"
Southwestern Historical Quarterly, XLIX, 428; Niles Register, V, 104.
Snodgrass, a native of Mississippi Territory, was reported as killed
in the Battle of Rosalis. Considering the general inaccuracy of the
reports from the republican army, this may be the same William
Snodgrass who, in May, 1813, was elected to the Mississippi Terri-
torial General Assembly. Sibley to Armstrong, May 7, 1813, Garrett,
"Sibley Letters," Southwestern Historical Quarterly, XLIX, 426; Wash-
ington (Mississippi Territory) Republican, May 11, 1813.
Josiah (Joseph) Taylor-see note 40.
Thomas was a Negro slave who belonged to Captain Taylor. A fine,
brave soldier, he was killed in the Battle of the White Cow. Gulick and
others, Lamar Papers, IV, Pt. 1, 279; Gutierrez to Ross (?), included
with Shaler to Monroe, February 26, 1813, Shaler Papers.
Jose Alvarez de Toledo-see note 129.
John Villars was born in Kentucky. He was reported by Sibley in
1811 to have been killed by Spanish troops after having relieved a
party of Spanish traders of $2o,ooo worth of goods while crossing the
Neutral Ground. Villars was wounded and made prisoner at the
Battle of the Medina. Later he was alcalde of San Buena Ventura in
1847. He married the widow of Peter Boon, and died in San Buena
Ventura. Gulick and others, Lamar Papers, IV, Pt. 1, 261; ibid., VI,
154; Sibley to unknown, July 17, 1811, Garrett, "Sibley Letters,"
Southwestern Historical Quarterly, XLIX, 116; Smithwick, Evolution
of a State, 44*

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101196/. Accessed July 29, 2014.