The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 67, July 1963 - April, 1964

Notes and Documents

Jaies 2ra#or Aster teacher
4A atleorial
WILLIAM C. POOL
AMES TAYLOR DIED IN A SAN MARCOS HOSPITAL ON NOVEMBER
26, 1962, after a lengthy illness; he was less than sixty-two
years of age. At the time of his death, Professor Taylor had
been chairman of the Division of Social Sciences at Southwest
Texas State College for sixteen years.
James Taylor, the son of Charles and Effie McGuyer Taylor,
was born on January 5, 191o, in Rogers, Bell County, Texas. He
was graduated from Rogers High School and received the Bachelor
of Arts, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees from
the University of Texas, where he majored in modern European
history, American history, and journalism. He was a graduate
fellow in history at the University of Chicago, 1929-193o, and
at the University of Texas in 1931-1932. Professor Taylor taught
at Lamar College, Texas Woman's University, Stephen F. Austin
State College, and the University of Chicago before becoming
professor of history and chairman of the social science division
of Southwest Texas State College in 1946.
During World War II, Taylor served as a lieutenant colonel in
the United States Air Force and was historian for the B-29
bomber command in the South Pacific theater of operations. He
was co-author of part of a seven-volume study entitled The Army
Air Force in World War II and was Air Force historian for the
Bikini atom bomb tests in 1946. He was recalled to the service
for a period of active duty in 1951 and retired from the Air
Force reserve as a colonel in July, 1962.
During the spring semester of 1958, he served as visiting pro-
fessor of history at the University of Texas, where his assignment
*This memorial was originally presented on April 26, 1963, at the sixty-seventh
annual meeting of the Texas State Historical Association.

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 67, July 1963 - April, 1964. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101197/. Accessed April 25, 2015.