The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 67, July 1963 - April, 1964

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H. BAILEY CARROLL
R ENA MAVERICK GREEN, a distinguished Texan and a leading
member of the Association, died in San Antonio on No-
vember 29, 1962. Dr. Pat Ireland Nixon has written the
following in appreciation of her outstanding life and career:
An epoch ended when Rena Maverick Green slipped away. Any
attempt to find some one to take her place would be empty and
fruitless. She was at the very heart of many organizations and many
peoples. She was the rallying point for many worthy causes which
she saw develop, grow and succeed. Whether these causes were relig-
ious, civic or historical, it was immaterial to her. Always she pulled
a mighty oar.
She was a historian by birth and by choice. She was truly born
in the lap of history and she took full advantage of it. Her name
appears fifteen times in the last Cumulative Index of the South-
western Historical Quarterly. She wrote many magazine articles and
letters, but historians of the future will remember her for publishing
two books: Memoirs of Mary A. Maverick and Samuel Maverick,
Texan, 1803-1870. These two books will be treasured and read as
long as Texas history is written.
Of course, I honor and revere her for her historical works. Most
of my contacts with her were at historical gatherings. And yet above
and beyond all else was the woman herself, warm-hearted and gentle.
She was kind and capable, sincere and honest, cultured and generous
-always in a good humor, speaking no evil, seeing no evil. Her
capacity for friendship was unbounded. To know her was to love her.
Her honor transcends the good name of a distinguished family.
Truly, an epoch ended when Rena Maverick Green closed her
eyes in her last and finest sleep.
The Texas State Historical Survey Committee is continuing
its highly successful efforts to preserve historical sites and build-
ings throughout Texas, coordinating the work of the Texas His-
torical Foundation and the Texas Civil War Centennial Commis-
sion. Up to the present time 1,175 historic buildings have been
recorded and hundreds have been saved and restored. Graves of
approximately two hundred prominent Texans of the past have

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 67, July 1963 - April, 1964. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101197/. Accessed November 21, 2014.