The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 68, July 1964 - April, 1965

THE SOUTHWESTERN HISTORICAL QUARTERLY
VOL. LXVIII APRIL, 1965 No. 4
Jlighihts of the DeVelopimiat of
,Aaufacturigf i/ &texras
1900-1960
EDWIN L. CALDWELL
THE HISTORY OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF MANUFACTURING IN
Texas offers an interesting study of an economy which
only recently has undergone its industrial revolution and
is presently on the road to industrial maturity. John S. Spratt
has done an excellent job of recording and analyzing the early
days of that development-roughly prior to 1900oo-in The Road
to Spindletop.' The purpose of this study is to carry the analysis
forward to the late 1950's.
As Texas entered the twentieth century, the big four of its
economy were cotton, cattle, corn, and lumber. By 1900oo, all
except corn had advanced to the stage of being carried on pri-
marily for an external market. As late as 187o, however, three of
those four leaders-cotton and corn growing and lumbering-had
been carried on primarily for local consumption, and cattle
reached distant markets only by virtue of the long and inefficient
cattle drive. But the coming in force of the railroads after 1870
provided the mechanism for turning the cotton and lumber in-
dustries into producers primarily for non-localized markets and
greatly improved the ability of ranchers to get cattle to distant
markets. Thus by 1900, the economy of Texas, in terms of the
state's leading components, had become integrated thoroughly
with that of the rest of the United States on the colonial basis
of supplying raw materials to the industrialized sectors and im-
porting manufactured products.
1John S. Spratt, The Road to Spindletop (Dallas, 1955).

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 68, July 1964 - April, 1965. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101198/. Accessed December 26, 2014.