The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 83, July 1979 - April, 1980

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

Papers Concerning Robertson's Colony in Texas. Compiled and edited
by Malcolm D. McIean. Vols. II, III. (Fort Worth: Texas Christian
Press, 1975, 1976. Pp. 687, 577. Introduction, bibliography, maps,
index. $2o each vol.)
Papers Concerng Robertson's Colony in 7Texas. Compiled and edited
by Malcolm D. McLean. Vols. IV, V. (Arlington: University of
Texas at Arlington Press, 1977, 1978. Pp. 626, 627. Introduction,
bibliography, maps, index. $2o each vol.)
Publication in 1974 of Volume I of Papers Concerning Robertson's
Colony in Texas found a receptive audience among readers of Texas
history. Evident was careful and exhaustive scholarship and a thorough
knowledge of the subject. Awards from the Texas State Historical As-
sociation and the Sons of the Republic of Texas reinforced the favorable
comments of reviewers. But Volume I was in some respects more tan-
talizing than satisfying. Covering the years 1788-1822, it was a back-
ground volume which offered mostly documents of Tennessee and pe.
ripheral Spanish records. Readers who were interested in documents
directly involved in Texas colonization were left awaiting subsequent
publications. Volumes II, III, IV, and V will satisfy the anticipations of
those who have been looking forward to such.
Volume II contains documents for the years 1823 through September,
1826. Of primary interest are records pertaining to the acquisition of
empresario grants, records relating to the activities of the Texas Asso-
ciation (forerunner of the Robertson Colony), and texts of the various
colonization laws. Also included are records, mostly Tennessee court
papers or newspapers, of members of the Robertson family and others
active in the Anglo-American colonization of Texas. The most promi-
nent individual featured is Robert Leftwich. A number of documents
focus on Leftwich's efforts to secure an empresario contract; his mys-
terious and permanent disappearance from the record ends the vol-
ume. Stephen Austin, Baron de Bastrop, and Haden Edwards are the
better known of the other figures of the volume. The record suggests a
degree of cooperation among the empresarios, but more often there is
a picture of intrigue and and conflict among them.
Beginning with documents of October, 1826, Volume III carries the
record through April, 1830. During this period the Texas Association
becomes the Nashville Company and employs a series of agents to carry
on after Leftwich's disappearance. Although Hosea League becomes the
company's agent, it is Stephen Austin who secures reaffirmation of the

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 83, July 1979 - April, 1980. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101207/. Accessed January 26, 2015.