The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 94, July 1990 - April, 1991

Notes and Documents
The Felix Nuiez Account and the Siege
of the Alamo: A Critical Appraisal
EDITED BY STEPHEN L. HARDIN *
THE ALAMO. THE NAME ALONE EVOKES POWERFUL IMAGES DEPICTING
the heroic battle fought in 1836. While it was a real event, it is in
the shadow world of myth that the battle is most often recalled.
The body of Alamo literature is immense, but because of the nature
of the source materials careful scholarly studies of the historical Alamo
are few. Most of them reflect only the victors' side of the story, though
many of the Mexican accounts are remarkably rich in detail.
Among them is that of alleged Mexican soldier Felix Nufiez, written in
1889 by an unnamed newspaperman from an interview with George W.
Noel who claimed to have interviewed Nufiez. Many chroniclers of the
battle have incorporated this narrative into their works, most to de-
scribe the death of David Crockett and to document William Barret
Travis's supposed attire.
Conflicting stories regarding Crockett's death began to circulate al-
most immediately after the battle. In a March 29, 1836, letter Texian E.
Bowker recounted the fall of the Alamo to his parents, telling how the
congressman reportedly met his fate: "he was found dead with about
o2 of the enemy with him and his rifle was broken to pieces [and] it is
supposed that he killed at least 20 or thirty himself[.]" In her book
Texas, which appeared in the summer of 1836, Mary Austin Holley
maintained that Crockett was one of seven defenders found alive after
active combat had ended. These seven "cried for quarter" but when
told that none would be given Holley stressed, "they continued fighting
*Stephen L Hardin is the author of several scholarly articles including one with James W.
Pohl, "The Military History of the Texas Revolution An Overview," which appeared in the
January, 1986 Quarterly Formerly a research fellow with the Handbook of Texas, Dr Hardin is
currently employed by the Texas State department of Highways and Public Tiansportation as
part of its Old San Antonio Road Project.

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 94, July 1990 - April, 1991. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101214/. Accessed April 20, 2014.