The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 99, July 1995 - April, 1996

Book Reviews

Bonnie and Clyde back in 1967. Next, Roger Redding tells how Texas won, then
lost, the superconducting super collider and names names in the process. Terry
Stark relates how the only authentic likeness of filibuster Philip Nolan recently
resurfaced. His miniature oil portrait is the only color reproduction in this issue
of the Texas Studies annual.
W. C. Jameson, a geographer at the University of Central Arkansas, concludes
that Texas-born country-and-western musicians tend to originate from urban
backgrounds, cities containing diverse ethnic groups but a strong Anglo compo-
nent. Next comes the first of two articles about the women of Texarkana, Janet
Brantley's discussion of their World War II role at Texarkana's Red River
Arsenal. The second is Beverly Rowe's account of prostitution in Texarkana
from the arrival of the railroads in 1873 through the first two decades of this
century, when the effects of "social housekeeping" began to be felt.
Lawrence Clayton of Hardin-Simmons University, an expert in ranching cul-
ture, records the history and current activities of the X Ranch at Kent. Frances
Neidhardt of Sherman reports on an interview with a North Texas couple who
offer a spirited defense of their hometown and its light-loafered lad who looted
church treasures during World War II service in Germany, plus those in the
community who apparently saw no moral or ethical problem in his wartime
behavior. The issue concludes with Katy Hoskins writing, with knowledge and
affection, of the prehistory, history, and natural history of the Trans-Pecos
region.
Of course, it is de rigeur in reviewing compendia such as this to intone
solemnly about "unevenness" from one essay to the next and to announce which
ones offer new insights and which ones don't. I shall forego that opportunity
and just send in ten bucks for next year's issue in anticipation of another two or
three hours of pleasurable and informative reading. Nor would I discourage any-
one from joining the Texas Studies Association, but that'll cost you twenty-five.
Stringtown AL LOWMAN
Arkansas Odyssey: The Saga of Arkansas from Prehistoric Times to Present. By Michael
B. Dougan. (Little Rock: Rose Publishing Co., 1994. Pp. xii+684. Foreword,
preface, introduction. ISBN 0-91454-665-1. $79.95.)
Arkansas Odyssey is a comprehensive history of Arkansas that is vast in scope,
beginning chronologically with paleo-Indians and ending with the election of
the state's longtime governor, William Jefferson Clinton, as president of the
United States. The topics addressed are equally broad. The author departs from
the political narrative that characterizes and dominates so many state histories to
identify and detail important economic, cultural, and social trends. The book is
particularly innovative in its emphasis on the state's twentieth-century history, an
era which has received relatively little attention. For the reader interested in
Arkansas, the book offers an imposing amount of material related to the state. It
is well-written, with wit and an eye for a good story. The basic narrative is supple-
mented with twenty-one biographical sketches offering insights into a variety of

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 99, July 1995 - April, 1996. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101217/. Accessed July 30, 2014.