The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 84, July 1980 - April, 1981

So u thwestern Historical Quarterly

187os or Blocker's own essay on the modernity of the dry leadership,
are directed at the specialist, other articles have a wider appeal. David
E. Kyvig makes an interesting, if occasionally strained, connection be-
tween the power of the repeal forces and the course of the New Deal in
its early years. Jay L. Rubin explores the question of why World War
II did not produce the temperance gains that characterized World War
I; and Larry Engelmann traces the success of the wets in Michigan
down to repeal. Other articles-by Gail Frankel and Paul C. White-
head, Ian R. Tyrell, David Huehner, and George C. Wittet-show
solid research and reveal the many available topics for further ex-
ploration.
One of the most helpful segments of this book is the comprehensive
bibliography, compiled by Jacquie Jessup, on "The Liquor Issue in
American History." Historians now have a convenient starting point
for their inquiries into the impact of the politics of alcohol on the de-
velopment of the United States. A state that still awaits a careful treat-
ment of the liquor issue, as it affected public policy, social tensions, and
religious attitudes, is Texas. No full account now exists of the wet-dry
battles in Texas from the 187os to the present. Perhaps Blocker's work
or that of his associates will stimulate an examination of the history of
temperance in Texas that is so badly needed.
University of Texas, Austin LEWIS L. GOULD
"On This Day of New Beginnings": Selected Inaugural Addresses of
Texas Governors. Edited by Archie P. McDonald. (Austin: Texas
State Library, 1979. Pp. x+ 126. Foreword, introduction, suggest-
ed reading. Paperback. $4.76.)
In this brief volume Professor McDonald has included the texts of
sixteen inaugural addresses given by twelve of Texas's forty-one elected
chief executives. Governors represented are James Pinckney Hender-
son, Sam Houston, Francis R. Lubbock, Edmund J. Davis, Richard
Coke, James S. Hogg, James E. and Miriam A. Ferguson, James V. All-
red, Allan Shivers, Price Daniel, and John B. Connally. McDonald's
introduction analyzes characteristics which the speeches have in com-
mon and points out contrasts in style, substance, and purpose.
This collection was clearly designed for the general reader. Such
can gain insight into the personalities, governing styles, and political
ideologies of the governors who are quoted. For example, one can note

366

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 84, July 1980 - April, 1981. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101225/. Accessed July 24, 2014.