The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 30, July 1926 - April, 1927

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

EXTRACTS FROM THE REMINISCENCES OF GENERAL
GEORGE W. MORGAN
I
CONTRIBUTED BY SAMUEL E. ASBURY
[Editorial note by the Contributor: Through Mrs. J. C. Nagle, now of
Dallas, Texas, but for many years a resident of College Station, Texas, I
first heard of the manuscript of General George W. Morgan, then in the
hands of her father, Colonel James Morris Morgan, of Washington, D. C.
The two Morgans were not related. Colonel James Morris Morgan sent
me the typewritten copy he had made of the original manuscript, suggest-
ing publication in Tue QUARTERLY. The original manuscript is not avail-
able. The story of the duel (pages 187-193) was published in The Military
Historian and Economist, I, 467-473.]
SKETCH OF MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE W. MORGAN
BY JAMES MORRIS MORGAN
Major General George W. Morgan was born in Washington
County, Pennsylvania, on the 20th of September, 1820. He was
the son of Thomas Morgan and Katharine Duane, his wife.
Thomas Morgan was an intimate friend of both President An-
drew Jackson and his wife, as can be seen by their intimate corre-
spondence. Katharine Duane was the daughter of Colonel William
Duane, Editor of the Philadelphia "Argus." The Duanes were
descendants of the Irish patriot, General Sarsfield, who was the
Earl of Lucan. Thomas Morgan was a son of Colonel George
Morgan of the Revolutionary Army. It was at the home of
Colonel George Morgan, "Morganza," near Washington, Pa., and
about sixteen miles from Pittsburgh, Pa., that Aaron Burr made
known his plans for a South Western Empire. Colonel Morgan
was indignant and was the first person to inform President Jeffer-
son of Burr's treasonable intentions. (See Letters of Jefferson,
also letter to Mrs. Katharine Duane Morgan, now in Congressional
Library.)
Colonel George Morgan and his sons John and Thomas were
witnesses against Burr at the trial in Richmond, Va., and Colonel
William Duane, accompanied by his daughter Katharine, was also
there reporting the famous trial for his newspaper. It was there
that Thomas Morgan first met his future wife, and became en-
gaged to her.
The manuscript of General George W. Morgan came into my
possession some twenty odd years ago when his widow and daughter,
both of whom have been dead for some years, were visiting at my
home in Washington, D. C. The writing that is not General
Morgan's is the penmanship of his daughter Sallie. If my mem-

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 30, July 1926 - April, 1927. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117142/. Accessed December 27, 2014.