The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 69, July 1965 - April, 1966

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Cvil War letterss rom Parsos'
rexas Cavalry Brigade
Edited by JOHNETTE HIGHSMITH RAY
PACKET OF LETTERS TIED IN FADED BLUE WAS THE LAST OF
great-grandma's belongings to be tossed at the fire, worth-
less things all, that had been important only to her. Grand-
mother watched the flames sadly a moment, then braved them
to retrieve the letters. "Somehow," she said, "it's like burning
part of her. She read these letters once in a while until the last."
Those letters recently came to the writer from an aunt who
knew of her interest in history. They are of value both as addi-
tions to the limited information available on Parsons' Brigade
and for the insight they offer on the day to day life and thoughts
of a private soldier in the Civil War.
John Truss lived with his young wife on a section of land in
Central Texas, called Pinoak because a little creek by this name
ran through that area. Their farm was approximately six miles
from Paige and fifteen from Bastrop. Marion, constantly referred
to in the letters, was his wife's brother, and the "Pinoak boys"
were his friends from his home community who made up part
of Company D, 12th Texas Cavalry, throughout the war.
State of Texas August go, 1861
Ellis County
Mrs. Rebecca Truss, my love, I take the present opportunity to
drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well at present
and hoping this may find you enjoying the same blessing.
We reached the camps of Colonel Parsons' regiment' yesterday
and were mustered into service today. Marion and William and all
the Pinoak boys are well; they send their best respects to all.
1William H. Parsons commanded the 12th Texas Cavalry.

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 69, July 1965 - April, 1966. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117144/. Accessed July 22, 2014.