The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 69, July 1965 - April, 1966

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

ingful. Boyd Saunder's sketches are fresh and pleasing. All in all,
the book is successful not only in its composition, but also in its
compilation. The assembling of records, facts, interviews, and
recollections is the real stuff of history. And it has ever been true
that "the child is father of the man." Therefore, Lyndon Baines
Johnson: The Formative Years is essential reading for anyone
seriously interested in the Thirty-Sixth President of the United
States.
EDWARD CLARK
Sam Houston's Texas. Photographs and text by Sue Flanagan.
Austin (The University of Texas Press), 1964. Pp. xvi+213.
Illustrations, maps, bibliography, index. $12.50.
This handsome offering of the University of Texas Press is a
Sam Houston book with a difference. The difference-and it is
considerable-lies in author Sue Flanagan's inventive photograph-
ic approach. A journalist and photographer by profession, and
a native Texan, Miss Flanagan came well-equipped to her ambi-
tious task.
The familiar Houston story, embellished by gleanings from
original research, is set within a photographic framework that
documents and vivifies the facts. Like the Texas Rangers that
Houston so admired, Miss Flanagan, with camera cocked, has
resolutely tracked her man. All of Texas east of San Antonio and
north of Refugio was Houston country. Miss Flanagan traversed
7,300 miles of it, committing his restless peregrinations to film.
In 113 artistic photographs, she evokes the multiplicity of Hous-
ton associations with which the region is endowed. The cohesive
for the pictures is a solid and well-written text. These elements,
chronologically arranged, detail the last thirty-one years of Hous-
ton's life, beginning that December day in 1832 when he first
crossed the Red River into Texas to become the towering figure
of its most eventful times.
Sam Houston's Texas, therefore, is a deft integration of pic-
tures and text-highly readable-a visual delight. A vast amount
of scholarly research went into it. In her investigations, the author
examined a plethora of published and unpublished materials,
including letters, journals, and newspaper accounts. Additional

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 69, July 1965 - April, 1966. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117144/. Accessed December 25, 2014.