The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 72, July 1968 - April, 1969

Book Reviews

veyed the whole of our national story. Nonetheless, we shall await
with interest the reception of this work by those with whom Price
disagrees.
The volume is clear, concise, well-written, and the word choice is
excellent. The work is commended to your serious reading and care-
ful consideration, whether you agree or disagree with the author's
conclusions.
Tarrant County Junior College EDWIN W. RICE
M. K. Kellogg's Texas Journal, 1872. Edited and with an Introduc-
tion by Llerena Friend. Austin (University of Texas Press), 1967.
Pp. 183. Illustrations, annotations, index. $5.00.
M. K. Kellogg came to North Texas in 1872 and recorded from
May to September his reminiscences in a journal he kept while
serving as the official artist with an expedition of the Texas Land
and Copper Association. The purpose of the expedition was to search
for copper, but the undertaking lacked leadership and ended in fail-
ure. Nevertheless, it took Kellogg from Grayson to Haskell counties,
sparsely settled areas at that time, still threatened by Indians, and
protected by outposts such as Belknap, Griffin, and Richardson. The
tour introduced him to the natural vitality of the region which is
the heart of the book. Kellogg writes in detail about the hardships,
the poor food, the heat, rattlesnakes, mosquitoes, floods, and bad roads.
Along with his complaints, however, the writer frequently gives beau-
tiful descriptions of the country he called a "vast amphitheatre." It
is a shame that the watercolor sketches by Kellogg were lost at the
end of the expedition.
To provide a clearer understanding of the diary, Miss Friend has
written an account of the Texas Land and Copper Association and
a perceptive biographical sketch on "the artist-diarist." Miss Friend
is a native of the area where Kellogg traveled and, careful historian
that she is, one would assume she would produce a fine piece of
editing. But Miss Friend always goes the extra historical mile, as
evidenced by her award-winning study of Sam Houston: The Great
Designer, and for Kellogg she researched in libraries, historical so-
cieties, and art galleries in this country and in Europe.
The book is enhanced by appropriate illustrations, helpful maps,
including one tracing the expedition, and valuable footnotes and
index. A tremendous amount of work went into this book and one

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 72, July 1968 - April, 1969. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117146/. Accessed May 30, 2016.

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