Annotations of the South Texas College of Law (Houston, Tex.), August, 1970

AH NOTATIONS
&f
Aoo), 70
1220 POLK - HOUSTON, TEXAS
The South Texas College of Law
The Student Bar Association
The new members of the 1970-71 Student Bar Associa-
tion Board of Governors have been sworn to office by Mr.
Weigel, Faculty Advisor. They are:
PRESIDENT: George Preston
VICE-PRESIDENT: Joe Stevens
SECRETARY: Richard Wells
TREASURER: Lovett Boggess
REPORTER: Gaylen Nix
SENIOR SENATOR: Jim Culpepper
L.S.D. REPRESENTATIVE: Wes Hocker
MID-LAW REPRESENTATIVE: Sam Adamo
FRESHMAN SENATOR: Keith Jenkins
At their first meeting (June), the Association re-elected
Mr. Weigel Faculty Advisor; elected Moses Sanchez Parlemen-
tarian; Andy Walch Chief Justice of the Honor Court; and
Robb Dunn Honor Court Counsel. Also, the Honor Court
members were elected. They are: Tony Gaurisco, Stan
Chapman, Richard Cobb, Ira Jones, David Lopez, Marty
McVey, Cynthia Lindsey, Ernestine Dansby, George Dannelly,
Dan Hennigan, John Gletson, Richard Bartley, Henry Wagner,
Howard Lucas and Paul Lawrence. Alternates are Bobby Most,
Tim Seo, Gladys Gaffney and H. T. Smith.
The Spring Semester Scholars
of South Texas College of Law
Congratulations to the students below! The following
students made the highest grade in each of the courses associa-
ted with their names below and will receive, at a minimum, the
American Jurisprudence Prize Award. They are:
JOHN J. ROBINSON - Administrative Law
and Admiralty.
DAVID M. OSTFELD - Agency and Partnership
and Procedure III.
JOHN A. MAXWELL - Conflict of Law.
WILLIAM K. WILDER - Constitutional Law.
RAYMOND J. WYRSCH - Contracts and Torts.
GORDON K. SMITH - Corporate Tax.
OLIVER J. MOAK - Corporations.
STEVEN J. WILLIAMS - Criminal Law I.
LEONARD L. ATTWELL, JR. -
Domestic Relations.
BILL E. SATTERWHITE - Equity.
DAVID T. LOPEZ - Evidence
and Workmen's Compensation.
E. PATRICK CHAUDOIR - Family Law.
(Continued on next page)
New and Exciting
Courses Taught This Fall
Offered for the first time this fall are three Seminars
which give promise to be, among many other things, interest-
ing, practical, exciting, and rewarding. The subject matter and
the Instructors for the Seminars are such that the student is
drawn to take all three of the courses. ANNOTATIONS asked
all three of the Instructors to give a brief synopsis of their
respective courses — They are given below.
APPELLATE COURTS SEMINAR: Two (2) Semester Hours.
INSTRUCTOR: Averum Jay Sprecher, B.A., Boston Univer-
sity; J. D., South Texas College of Law.
PREREQUISITE: Procedure II and III.
CLASS MEETS: Thursday - 7:30 - 9:30 P.M.
"Appellate Courts", by appellation, suggests through
logical indication that a study of the three distinct genre of
appellate tribunals within the legal structure of the State
(Court of Civil Appeals, Court of Criminal Appeals, and Su-
preme Court) will comprise the course schema. However, due
to the enormousness and enormity of the subject matter
contained in the appellate process of the civil system, criminal
jurisdiction will be excluded.
Primary emphasis will be placed upon the "application
for writ of error" (appeal) to the Supreme Court of Texas,
concomitantly with the jurisdictional requirements that must
be properly and seasonably met in the trial court and Court
of Civil Appeals, in order to perfect that appeal to the highest
State Court.
The theme of this seminar will unrelentingly be prag-
matism — avoidance of academics and the indigestation caused
by rote ingestion of rules, dates and divers technisms — with
constructive participation by the student in the step by step
process pursued by lawyers in their perfection of a functional
record for appeal, and then in correct sequence, what the law-
yers and the Supreme Court do with the record when it
actually "goes up" on appeal.
In order to accommodate and accelerate the learning
process, there will be an examination and discussion of a com-
pleted record from an actual case that has already been
disposed of by the Supreme Court.
This is a good time to note the paper requirement in this
course. It will not be a single magnum opus, to be tendered
near or at the end of the semester. Rather, it will entail the
highly practical exercise of drawing, intermittently during the
span of the semester, all of the motions and papers that com-
prise the record. Since this is neither a course in Practice Court
or Legal Research and Writing, let me stress that a premium
will be placed on the proper construction of the constituent
(Continued on next page)

Nix, Gaylen L. Annotations of the South Texas College of Law (Houston, Tex.), August, 1970. Houston, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth144325/. Accessed September 22, 2014.