The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 45, July 1941 - April, 1942

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

opinion that the action of the Texas Senate upon treaties, like
that of the United States Senate, was limited to granting or
withholding its advice and consent to ratification--with or
without amendments, of course.
The book is singularly free of purely typographical errors.
Two such, however, may be noted. Certainly "December 12,
1836" (p. 103) should read December 12, 1839; while in the
bibliography the family name of Charles A. Gulick is given
as "Gluick" (p. 242). The Dictionary of American Biography,
however, is listed as "The American Biographical Dictionary"
(p. 82, note 51). This item, moreover, is one of several cited
in footnote references but not included in the bibliography.
It is a source of regret that so much space was required to
analyze what the reviewer regards as weaknesses of this volume.
They are, after all, relatively minor both in quantity and sub-
stance as compared to the estimable qualities of this authorita-
tive survey. The author deserves the thanks of his fellow-
students for having made such a contribution to the existing
literature in the field of Texas history.
R. EARL MCCLENDON.
Sam Houston State Teachers College.
Gail Borden, Pioneer. By Clarence R. Wharton.
San Antonio: The Naylor Co., 1941. Pp. vii, 229. Frontispiece. $2.50.
The publication of the biography of Gail Borden, Jr., helps
to fill a gap in Texas history that has been somewhat puzzling.
That no historian of Texas has delved heretofore into Borden's
life in Texas occasions some surprise; that chroniclers of the
rise of American industry during and after the Civil War have
also neglected him only adds to the surprise. Although not an
exhaustive study, this book does represent a beginning in por-
traying the life of this many-sided man who was journalist,
public servant, and benefactor of mankind.
Emphasis has been placed on Borden's activities from his
arrival in New Orleans in 1822, when he first learned of Austin's
projected colony, to his experiments with the meat biscuit in
the late 1840's. Of fourteen chapters in the book, ten are de-

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 45, July 1941 - April, 1942. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth146053/. Accessed January 31, 2015.