The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 45, July 1941 - April, 1942

Book Reviews

six months. It was at first favorably received in Spain, but
the intrigues of court favorites soon produced such an adverse
reaction that the Spanish government did not approve the treaty
until October, 1820. Ratifications were finally exchanged in
Washington on February 22, 1821.
Brooks emphasizes the fact that the Adams-Onis Treaty pro-
vided for no "purchase" of the Floridas. The section relative
to the cession of the Floridas was nicely phrased so as to
satisfy both contracting parties. The author feels certain that
the Spanish ministry made use of Pichardo's Treatise in prepar-
ing instructions to Onis. He suggests that possibly John Jacob
Astor influenced Adams to propose the extension of the bound-
ary line to the Pacific. The role played by the Spanish gov-
ernment in the negotiations, which historians have most neg-
lected in discussing the treaty, forms the dominant theme of
the narrative. Brooks is the first student to incorporate in a
single volume the results of a thorough examination of all
available materials in the archives of the United States, Spain,
England, and France bearing upon the treaty. Copious notes
at the end of each chapter testify to the prodigious extent of
his research. Reproduction of maps and the inclusion of help-
ful appendices contribute to the excellence of this compre-
hensive study.
GRADY D. PRICE.
Southwestern Louisiana Institute.
Hands Off : A History of the Monroe Doctrine. By Dexter
Perkins.
Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1941. Pp. xii, 455. Illustra-
tions, index, bibliography. $3.50.
The volume under consideration is the most inclusive of all
the myriad of books on the Monroe Doctrine. It begins with
the evolution of the fundamental principles underlying the doc-
trine and ends with a cautious prediction of its probable role in
the years which lie ahead.
Dexter Perkins, the author of the book, and definitely an
authority on the Monroe Doctrine, incorporates many features
to stimulate and delight the reader. First, as fairness would
seem to demand, he gives full credit to John Adams for the
non-colonization clause and for the final form in which Monroe

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 45, July 1941 - April, 1942. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth146053/. Accessed December 21, 2014.