Black Gold, Volume 3, Number 1, 1976

By Marian Brown

The Holland Quarters Community is located five miles west of
Carthage on Highway 79. The history of the Holland Quarters goes
back to post-civil war days. The community was named after Mar-
shall Holland, a resident whop as a slave, took his name from the
white owner of the land in that area of Panola County, Mr. Spencer
Holland. When the civil war began, Mr. Spencer Holland had moved
off the land and left it to the families who lived in his slave
Quarters.
The story is that Marshall Holland moved out of his house
into a cave located on the present Lee F. Johns property behind
the present Holland Quarters Cafe, close to a large spring. He
moved into the cave to avoid having to go to the army.
Mrs. Jim Hicks stated, "The man that lived in the hole was my great-
grandfather. I was told that Grand Pa Marshall would go in the
hole in the day, and at night people would give a dance, and he'd
cut up more than anybody else, and the next morning nobody could
find him." Mrs. Hicks also remembered an incident when her aunt
told her that she would send her dausther down to the cave with
a bucket of food for Marshall Holland's breakfast, dinner or suppers
and she'd tell her to sit it on the wash block (a block close to
the spring where people would take their clothes to be washed) and
leave that bucket and get the other one. Mrs. Hicks added, "There
ain't many people living here now. This land was covered with
huts and little houses, and lots of people used to live here.
There was huts from the highway all the way back to the Lawson
Adam's place."
Highway 79 divides the community in two sections. The first
section of Holland Quarters a half mile to the left of Highway
79. The first section has four church: Pine Grove Church, John-

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Panola College. Dept. of Communications. Black Gold, Volume 3, Number 1, 1976. Carthage, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth151414/. Accessed July 30, 2014.