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[The Hexagon Hotel]

Description:

The Hexagon Hotel was built in 1895 by David G. Galbraith, the inventor of the paper clip, and co-developer of acetate synthetic fiber.
According to Ellen Puerzer ("The Octagon House Inventory", Eight-Square Publishing, copyright 2011), the building was twelve-sided, clad with clapboard, built on a stone foundation. Two English stonemasons did all stonework, presumably also the work on the DC generating plant next to the hotel. The rooms within were hexagon-shaped, with a bath being shared between every two rooms. The well-ventilated "honeycomb" structure (a master-stroke in the days before air-conditioning)opened in December 1897.
The stone building behind and left of the Hotel is the plant for generating electricity used for light and fans (for a fee) in every room in the hotel.

Creator(s): Unknown
Location(s): United States - Texas - Palo Pinto County - Mineral Wells
Creation Date: 1897/1924  
Partner(s):
Boyce Ditto Public Library
Collection(s):
A. F. Weaver Collection
Usage:
Total Uses: 123
Past 30 days: 0
Yesterday: 0
Creator:
Unknown
Date(s):
  • Creation: 1897/1924
  • Digitized: September 25, 2006
Coverage:
Place
United States - Texas - Palo Pinto County - Mineral Wells
Era
New South, Populism, Progressivism, and the Great Depression, 1877-1939
Description:

The Hexagon Hotel was built in 1895 by David G. Galbraith, the inventor of the paper clip, and co-developer of acetate synthetic fiber.
According to Ellen Puerzer ("The Octagon House Inventory", Eight-Square Publishing, copyright 2011), the building was twelve-sided, clad with clapboard, built on a stone foundation. Two English stonemasons did all stonework, presumably also the work on the DC generating plant next to the hotel. The rooms within were hexagon-shaped, with a bath being shared between every two rooms. The well-ventilated "honeycomb" structure (a master-stroke in the days before air-conditioning)opened in December 1897.
The stone building behind and left of the Hotel is the plant for generating electricity used for light and fans (for a fee) in every room in the hotel.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): Lost Treasure | Hexagon Hotel
Partner:
Boyce Ditto Public Library
Collection:
A. F. Weaver Collection
Identifier:
  • LOCAL-CONT-NO: AWO_0025P
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metapth20365
Resource Type: Photograph
Format: Image
Rights:
Access: Public
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