[The Brick Road East of Mineral Wells]

Description:

The brick highway (emphatically not yellow brick!)east of Mineral Wells (the Bankhead Highway) was the nation's first transcontinental highway, beginning at milepost 0 on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. and ending at San Diego, California.
Bricks for it in this area were made in Thurber, Texas (on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line). All bricks were laid by two (some say one) black masons.
Bricks made in Thurber were also used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave the streets of Fort Worth, and even Congress Avenue in Austin, Texas.

Creator(s): Unknown
Location(s): United States - Texas - Palo Pinto County - Mineral Wells
Creation Date: Unknown
Partner(s):
Boyce Ditto Public Library
Collection(s):
A. F. Weaver Collection
Usage:
Total Uses: 230
Past 30 days: 2
Yesterday: 0
Creator:
Unknown
Date(s):
  • Digitized: November 27, 2006
Coverage:
Place
United States - Texas - Palo Pinto County - Mineral Wells
Era
Into Modern Times, 1939-Present
Description:

The brick highway (emphatically not yellow brick!)east of Mineral Wells (the Bankhead Highway) was the nation's first transcontinental highway, beginning at milepost 0 on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. and ending at San Diego, California.
Bricks for it in this area were made in Thurber, Texas (on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line). All bricks were laid by two (some say one) black masons.
Bricks made in Thurber were also used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave the streets of Fort Worth, and even Congress Avenue in Austin, Texas.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): Milsap Highway
Partner:
Boyce Ditto Public Library
Collection:
A. F. Weaver Collection
Identifier:
  • LOCAL-CONT-NO: AWO_0122P
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metapth20467
Resource Type: Photograph
Format: Image
Rights:
Access: Public