North Texas Daily (Denton, Tex.), Vol. 98, No. 48, Ed. 1 Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Page 2
News
Wednesday, November 16,2011
Amber Arnold and Valerie Gonzalez, News Editors
ntdnewseditors@gmail.com
SGA carts students to class,
raises money or cancer
Ann Smajstrla
Staff Writer
Members of the Student
Government Association are
providing golf cart rides to
students around campus this
week as part of the Carts for
Cancer frundraiser, which
benefits the Cook Children's
Health Care System.
Students can pay $1 for rides
across campus or $5 for rides
across Interstate 35E in one of
two golf carts driven by SGA
senators.
"It's a way for us to put on
a philanthropy, but it's also a
way for us to get to know our
constituents," said College of
Business senator David Schuler.
"I can talk to other people on
the car rides over, tell them
what's going on in SGA and
how they can get involved and
how they can stay updated. So
it's kind of a 'kill two birds with
one stone' kind of deal,"
Proceeds will be donated
to Cook Children's, a Fort
Worth-based hospital system
that specializes in cancer treat-
ment and research for chil-
dren. It was chosen as the offi-
cial philanthropy for Carts for
Cancer when the program
started last year.
"It's obviously a wonderful
charity," SGA President Blake
Windham said. "Everyone
wants to combat childhood
cancer."
Political science senior Eric
Shockey took advantage of
the $1 ride Tuesday and said
the cause is special to him
because his father is battling
brain cancer.
"It's a good cause, and it's
better than walking," Shockey
said.
Students are also welcome
to call the SGA office to
reserve a ride in a cart, said
criminal justice sophomore
and SGA sergeant-at-arms
Marcos Torres.
"As long as we have a cart
available, and they tell us,
'Hey, I need someone to pick
me up at 'so-and-so" at a
certain time, we can defi-
nitely go ahead and pick them
up," Torres said.
The program took in $161
in its first day and hopes to
surpass the nearly $1,300
it raised last year, said
speaker of the senate Charles
Vincent.
Carts for Cancer will run
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. through
Friday, and if it continues to
be successful, Torres said the
SGA plans to reserve three
carts to handle more riders.
Kodak
Continued from Page 1
The crew, who made three
six-hour journeys to Caddo
Lake to film, knew its efforts
were paying off as production
went along, Spires said. A few
crew members had worked
together on small projects
before, he said, but everything
went along smoothly.
"We had a joke on-set that
we must be doing something
terribly wrong and we wouldn't
know until we got the film
back," Chapin said. "It became
so involved with everybody
that all we were really thinking
about was what we were doing
at the time."
The award is one opportu-
nity for students and recently
graduated cinematographers
to have work recognized, as
it only considers that element
of production and only
allows student submissions,
according to the competition's
website.
"The Whale"
PLOT
A young boy lives in an
ephemeral fantasy to
try to escape a cycle
of paternal abuse.
WWW.VIMEO.COM
City
Continued from Page 1
Constructing the transmis-
sion line along the southern
side of Loop 288, north of the
Hercules Lane route, is one
option DME has considered,
Williams said, but no final
plans have been agreed upon.
If the route were moved north,
its cost would be around $11
million, he said.
Controversy over the
proposed yellow route
stemmed from residents'
concern that the transmis-
sion lines would harm prop-
erty values because of the
easements necessary for
construction.
Johnny Davis, who owns
a home near Hercules Lane,
said residents in that neigh-
borhood did not receive suffi-
cient notice about the project,
Photo by Andrew Williams/Staff Photographer
Police officer Orlando Hinojosa watches the City Council meeting Tuesday
night. The Council delayed voting on the yellow and purple routes. These
routes represent the reconstruction of transmission lines in northeast Denton.
and said the estimated costs
were not made clear.
"I think as citizens and
families of this neighborhood,
and as taxpayers to the city,
we have the right to see those
numbers," Davis said.
The City Council also
discussed amendments to
the city's second phase of
gas well ordinances during
the Council's work session.
District 1 City Councilman
Kevin Roden said nothing
was decided and the session
was more an update about the
progress of the first phase of
ordinances.
Want to be
the editor?
Publications Committee
seeks Spring NT Daily Editor.
Applications available online at
www.ntdaily.com and in GAB117.
Applicants must submit a resume and two
letters of recommendation (one recommenda-
tion letter shall be from a faculty member and
one recommendation letter from a faculty, staff
member, or professional journalist outside of the
NT Daily) along with the completed application.
Completed applications should be emailed by
5 p.m., November 18* to Dr. Jay Allison,
jay.allison@unt.edu
Applicants to be able to meet with
Publications Committee Monday,
November 21 at 4pm p.m. in GAB 114
incomplete or late applications will
not be accepted.
*9
Photo by Anam Bakali/Contributing Photographer
Zane Reif, director of the University Union, introduces the members of the architectural firm Perkins + Will, the firm
chosen for the renovation of the Union, to the Master Plan committee members at the beginning of the focus group
Tuesday evening. The meeting gave an opportunity to the architects to hear what the students want and expect out
from a new student union.
Union
Continued from Page 1
"What I've heard from
other architects is we have
a really good base," Reif
said. "Our columns and
pillars lend themselves to
be conducive [to renova-
tion construction]."
Essentially, the Union
will need to be "gutted"
to take care of its less-
desirable features such as
roof leaks and asbestos
before construction can
commence, Reif said.
"Because we were grand-
fathered in, we didn't have
to have a sprinkler system,"
Reif said.
The renovated Union will
incorporate these updates
along with a number of ameni-
ties students suggest.
Construction is scheduled to
begin in 2014 to be completed
by 2016, pending approval
from a student referendum
in March 2012.
The Master Plan committee,
composed of various appointed
students as well as faculty, will
continue its quest to scope out
different universities' unions
with a trip to A&M on Friday.
The company has more
LEED-accredited professionals
than any other design firm
in North America, according
to bdcnetwork.com, and was
ranked as the #1 Design Firm
by ARCHITECT Magazine of
2011, according to the maga-
zine's website.
Perkins+Willalso designed
the new Life Sciences Complex,
completed last spring.
The firm's team will meet
with other members of the
UNT community today in the
Silver Eagle Suite.
Employ
Continued from Page 1
According to the FAQs,
employees fired under the
at-will policy would still
undergo a review process,
although it would be much
more expedient than the
current for-cost system.
Under the for-cost system,
employees who complete a
probationary period can only
be terminated for cause, and
after going through certain
procedural steps, Jackson
wrote in the email.
Questions left unanswered
during Tuesday's meetings
will be addressed in an
updated FAQ expected to be
released Friday, Escalante
said.
About 75 employees packed
into University Union 412 for
the second meeting Tuesday
night, and several wanted to
know why a change in policy
is being considered.
"What is it about our
current system that is broken
and requires a complete
rewrite?" asked Dennis Fisher,
associate director ofwind studies
for UNT's College of Music.
The meetings drew UNT
police officers, custodians, lab
directors, counselors and others,
none of whom openly said they
" This policy
is dearing
the way for a
significant firing
of employees
without reason."
—Charles Norton
Visual arts employee
supported an at-will employ-
ment policy.
Ron Dilulio, director of
the astronomy lab program
and planetarium, said UNT
employees are frightened by
the possibility of their jobs and
benefits becoming less secure.
North Texas Daily
Editorial Staff
Editor-in-chief Josh Pherigo
Managing Editor Amber Arnold
Assigning Editor .Valerie Gonzalez
Arts and Life Editor Jesse Sidlauskas
Sports Editor Sean Gorman
Views Editor Ian Jacoby
Visuals Editor ...Drew Gaines
Photo Assigning Editor Cristy Angulo
Multimedia Manager Berenice Quirino
Copy Chief Carolyn Brown
Design Editors Sydnie Summers
Stacy Powers
Senior Staff Writers
Nicole Balderas, Brittni Barnett, Paul Bottoni,
Bobby Lewis, Alex Macon, Isaac Wright
Senior Staff Photographer
James Coreas
Advertising Staff
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Josue Garcia
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Dilulio and several others said
they felt a switch to an at-will
policy would change their posi-
tive view of the university.
"This Chancellor [Jackson] has
managed to pull and defer our
funds away from this campus
to a system we don't agree with,"
he said.
Dilulio and others suggested
that difficulties dealing with
underperforming employees and
other problems with the UNT
System's employment policy
could be addressed without
changing to at-will status.
Charles Norton, a part-time
employee at UNT's visual arts
program and member of the
Texas State Employees Union,
said a change to at-will status
would lead to unfair firings at
the university.
"This policy is clearing the
way for a significant firing of
employees without reason,"
Norton said.
Escalante said concerns
from UNT employees would
be addressed further in a press
release Friday. UNT will accept
comments until Nov. 21 at:
comments_at-will@untsystem.
edu.
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Pherigo, Josh. North Texas Daily (Denton, Tex.), Vol. 98, No. 48, Ed. 1 Wednesday, November 16, 2011. Denton, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth209202/. Accessed September 17, 2014.