Memorial and Biographical History of Dallas County, Texas.

50 PRRJIDEATTS OZ~ Till? UATI TED STATES.

combinations which led to his trial for treason.
He was warmly received by Jackson,
at whose instance a public ball was given
in his honor at Nashville, and contracted
with the latter for boats and provisions.
Early in 1807, when Burr had been proclaimed
a traitor by President Jefferson,
volunteer forces for the Federal service
were organized at Nashville under Jackson's
command;' but his energy and activity
did not shield him from suspicions of
connivance in the supposed treason. He
was summoned to Richmond as a witness
in Burr's trial, but was not called to the
stand, probably because he was out-spoken
in his partisanship.
On the outbreak of the war with Great
Britain in I812, Jackson tendered his services,
and in January, I813, embarked for
New Orleans at the head of the Tennessee
contingent. In March he received an order
to disband his forces; but in September
he again took the field, in the Creek
war, and in conjunction with his former
partner, Colonel Coffee, inflicted upon the
Indians the memorable defeat at Talladega,
Emuckfaw and Tallapoosa.
In May, I814, Jackson, who had now acquired
a national reputation, was appointed
a Major-General of the United States army,
and commenced a campaign against the
British in Florida. He conducted the defense
at Mobile, September 15, seized upon
Pensacola, November 6, and immediately
transported the bulk of his troops to New
Orleans, then threatened by a powerful
naval force. Martial law was declared in
Louisiana, the State militia was called to
arms, engagements with the British were
fought December 23 and 28, and after re-enforcements
had been received on both sides
the famous victory of January 8, 1815,
crowned Jackson's fame as a soldier, and
made him the typical American hero of
the first half of the nineteenth century.
In I817-'18 Jackson conducted the war

against the Seminoles of Florida, during
which he seized upon Pensacola and executed
by courtmartial two British subjects,
Arbuthnot and Ambrister--acts which
might easily have involved the United
States in war both with Spain and Great
Britain. Fortunately the peril was averted
by the cession of Florida to the United
States; and Jackson, who had escaped a
trial for the irregularity of his conduct
only through a division of opinion in Monroe's
cabinet, was appointed in 1821 Governor
of the new Territory. Soon after he
declined the appointment of minister to
Mexico.
In 1823 Jackson was elected to the United
States Senate, and nominated by the Tennessee
Legislature for the Presidency. This
candidacy, though a matter of surprise, and
even merryment, speedily became popular,
and in 1824, when the stormy electoral canvas
resulted in the choice of John Quincy
Adams by the House of Representatives,
General Jackson received the largest popular
vote among the four candidates.
In 1828 Jackson was triumphantly elected
President over Adams after a campaign of
unparalleled bitterness. He was inaugurated
March 4, 1829, and at once removed
from office all the incumbents belonging to
the opposite party-a procedure new to
American politics, but which naturally became
a precedent.
His first term was characterized by quarrels
between the Vice-President, Calhoun,
and the Secretary of State, Van Buren, at.
tended by a cabinet crisis originating in
scandals connected with the name of Mrs.
General Eaton, wife of the Secretary of
War; by the beginning of his war upon the
United States Bank, and by his vigorous
action against the partisans of Calhoun,
who, in South Carolina, threatened to
nullify the acts of Congress, establishing a,
protective
tariff.
, In the Presidential campaign of I834

Lewis Publishing Company. Memorial and Biographical History of Dallas County, Texas.. Chicago, Illinois. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20932/. Accessed December 19, 2014.