Memorial and Biographical History of Dallas County, Texas.

AtADRtW yAC9SON.

Jackson received 219 out of 288 electoral
votes, his competitor being Mr. Clay, while
Mr. Wirt, on an Anti-Masonic platform,
received the vote of Vermont alone. In
I833 President Jackson removed the Government
deposits from the United States
bank, thereby incurring a vote of censure
from the Senate, which was, however, expunged
four years later. During this second
term of office the Cherokees, Choctaws and
Creeks were removed, not without difficulty,
from Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi,
to the Indian Territory; the National
debt was extinguished; Arkansas and
Michigan were admitted as States to the
Union; the Seminole war was renewed; the
anti-slavery agitation first acquired importance;
the Mormon delusion, which had
organized in 1829, attained considerable
proportions in Ohio and Missouri, and the
Country experienced its greatest pecuniary
panic.
Railroads with locomotive propulsion
were introduced into America during Jackson's
first term, and had become an important
element of national life before the
close of his second term. For many reasons,
therefore, the administration of President
Jacksocn formed an era in American
history, political, social and industrial.
He succeeded in effecting the election of

his friend Van Buren as his successor, retired
from the Presidency March 4, 1837;
and led a tranquil life at the Hermitage
until his death, which occurred June 8,
845.
During his closing years he was a professed
Christian and a member of the Presbyterian
church. No American of this
century has been the subject of such opposite
judgments. He was loved and hated
with equal vehemence during his life, but
at the present distance of time from his
career, while opinions still vary as to the
merits of his public acts, few of his countrymen
will question that he was a warmhearted,
brave, patriotic, honest and sincere
man. If his distinguishing qualities were
not such as constitute statesmanship, in the
highest sense, he at least never pretended
to other merits than such as were written
to his credit on the page of American his.
tory-not attempting to disguise the de.
merits which were equally legible. The
majority of his countrymen accepted and
honored him, in spite of all that calumny
as well as truth could allege against him.
His faults may therefore be truly said to
have been those of his time; his magnificent
virtues may also, with the same justice,
be considered as typical of a state of
society which has nearly passed away.

Lewis Publishing Company. Memorial and Biographical History of Dallas County, Texas.. Chicago, Illinois. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20932/. Accessed December 27, 2014.