History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857

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and
Baily McFadgin, who were moving away with 'their families. Bledsoe was
with them. I was accompanied by nine men, under my command: Col. Wat
Morman, Col. Jao. E. Myrick, Tom Josy, Sam Wallace, Frank Hooper, Monroe
Hooper, James Vaughan and Lee Truitt. We started in pursuit but had to
take a circuitous route to avoid the clan: We went across the Neches and in
the direction of Crockett. We surprised Strickland in his camp near the
residence of "One Eyed Williams," twenty-five miles north of Crockett, but he
made his escape in a thicket. In the latter part of the night we heard signals
in the thicket and at the camp. Strickland did not return to the wagon and we
rode to the camp and gave orders to Smith, the driver of the team, to leave,
which he did, and the team was afterwards driven by the woman. We went
on to Albright's and stopped for supper and to feed our horses. While there
Williams and Strickland came up. The alarm was given and they turned to
run and were fired upon by Colonel Myrick. Strickland was wounded by one
shot in the shoulder and a finger cut. At the fire of the gun Strickland ran
over Williams, who lost his gun. Williams hid himself in a ditch where we
found and arrested him, but Strickland made his escape, by lying upon the side
of his horse as he ran around the lots. This occurred just as the moon was
rising. Strickland threw away his gun and I found it and also found the gun
belonging to Williams. We took Williams in charge and induced him to give
us information in regard to the McFadgins and to guide us to where they were.
Under his lead we found and arrested the McFadgins. We found them a mile
south of the town of Montgomery at the house of Alex Whittaker. We left
Williams in charge of the horses and surrounded the house. McNeil, sheriff
of the county was living there, and at the time in bed with John McFadgin.
When I went around the house I found it barred up. Baily and Bill McFadgin
were also in the house. Bill having a few minutes before ran and closed up the
door. I found a window unfastened, but before I could get it open it was
latched against me. At this time McNeil came to me, told who he was and
offered his services to get a guard and assist in the arrest. We went to the
town of Montgomery to get the necessary authority from the Justice of the
Peace and were delayed by the absence of the Justice. During our absence
Bledsoe came up in company with Bowlin; on discovering him, Myrick and
Frank Hooper ordered him to halt and surrender, when he sprang upon them
both and came near wresting their guns from them; in the melee Myricks gun
was broken and Hooper shot Bledsoe, but did no serious injury. Bledsoe had
taken Hooper's gun from him and was in the act of striking him with it, when
Myrick again fired and slightly wounded Bledsoe. He was then shot and killed
by Jim Vaughan. The McFadgins in the house were now called upon to
surrender, and after some consultation, they complied upon the understanding
that they were to be taken safely to Shelby county and tried by the citizens, a
majority to rule, and they were not to be rescued or make any effort at escape
They were then taken into custody.

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Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857. Fort Worth, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/. Accessed July 14, 2014.