History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857

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CHAPTER
VII.
On our way to this place, where the capture was made, we found an entire
captain's company assembled to protect these men, but we passed through their
ranks, and by our rapid movements and silence so confused them that we were
suffered to pass and get entirely clear without molestation. We started on our
return, and arriving in the town of Crockett, found that Strickland had procured
a writ to be issued and placed in the hands of the sheriff for the arrest of
Morman, myself and three others, who were not with us, but supposed to be
part of our posse. The sheriff commenced summoning a body of men to assist
in our apprehension, but on proper representations from a man acquainted with
us, came alone to use, told his business, when we surrendered to him and
returned into the town of Crockett. We sent an officer with a writ for the arrest
of Jim Strickland, who was six miles from town. The town was full of people.
We exhibited our authority to them and told our business, but we found a large
majority opposed to us-only about one-fourth being in our favor. One
Josephus Moore attempted to create the impression that he was our friend, but
after looking well at him, I decided that he could not be depended upon. A
trial was demanded at once and without waiting for the man, Strickland, who
had caused our detention. During the progress of the trial I observed that a
great many guns were brought up to the room in which the trial was had, and
afterwards learned that an effort was to be made to take my life. A difficulty
was to have been commenced and twenty-four guns were ready to be used
against me alone. As I left the room I was accosted by a man whose
business it was to begin or bring on the difficulty. Col. Morman drew his attention
from me, and I was then accosted by a man named Clapp. These men,
leaving us, ran across the street to Moor's tavern, and I mounted my horse standing
at the door, and here also were my prisoners and guard, and by a concerted
movement we wheeled our horses and placed the prisoners between us and the
tavern where their friends were stationed, and went rapidly out of town. Immediately
a crowd of sixty men assembled and followed, but we traveled faster than
they; they continued in pursuit until they reached the residence of one-eyed
Williams, twenty-five miles, where they supposed we would stop for the night
and being informed by him that we had passed that place some hours before,
they turned back. We camped that night thirty-nine miles from Crockett, on
our return to Shelby county. We met with no more trouble, and on my arrival
I sent out five men to notify the people to be in Shelbyville on the ensuing Saterday
at twelve o'clock, M. Next morning we went to the widow Moore's for
breakfast, when we were visited by many citizens, and there being men enough
to relieve the old guard, the prisoners were placed under their charge, and we
were advised to take our needed rest. The new guard becoming careless and
too confident, presented an opportunity and John McFadgin attempted to make
his escape, and ran some distance, but I overtook him in the bed of a branch
near by and brought him back. Again Bill McFadgin seeing what he supposed

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Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857. Fort Worth, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/. Accessed November 27, 2014.