History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857

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was
"Through the deep waters I call thee to go." After the singing the apparition
disappeared, and then the dream revealed parties firing upon me, and the
firing was from exactly the same direction that it afterwards took place. I
dreamed that the balls struck me in exactly the same place that I was struck
afterwards. Many years before, that is in the year 1829, while I lived in Tennessee,
long before I had any design of removing to Texas, I had the same dream
precisely. To me these seemed supernatural warnings and had their effect upon
my mind. Whether or not there is anything in dreams I could not help regarding
mine as peculiar and strange, and when I heard the click of the gun locks
as they prepared to fire, I looked in the direction indicated by the visions and
distinctly saw the parties as they fired. I did not permit my wounds to keep me
long confined to the house, and on the fifth day I was on horseback and rode in
a dark and stormy night fourteen miles in search of the men who attempted my
life. I soon after fell sick and it being dangerous and inconvenient for me to
remain at my residence, I went to Louisiana to the house of Wm. White, my
brother-in-law, on Wallace's bayou, fifteen miles below Shreveport, and remained
five weeks. I started back home and at Logansport remained one night to avoid
another gang lying by the wayside to attack me. I reached home safely. The
day after my arrival I received the most welcome information that Jim Strickland
and Farrar Metcalf had both been lately killed in Louisiana for negro stealing.
CHAPTER VIII.
In 1841, John M. Bradley and John Haley, both residents of Shelby county,
went to Austin and there hired four men, viz: Seekers, Wills, York and Hines
to go to Shelby county and kill seventeen men, and those the most prominent in
the county. For the life of Henry Reynolds they were to receive six hundred
dollars. This money was to be paid by Jim Hall, and he furnished a gun for
the purpose. Bradley also supplied a gun. In pursuance of this object,
Reynolds was visited by Seekers and Hines, who remained one night at his
house. The evening was passed in conversation, and a favorable impression
was made by Reynolds upon Hines, who when they had retired, informed
Seekers that he had found Reynolds a good man, different from what had been
represented and that he would have nothing to do with his murder, and he drew
out of the gang. Hines was never after heard of. After this Seekers and Wells
went to Reynolds' house designing to commit the deed, but learning that Reynolds
was going to Shreveport with cotton, the commission of the act was postponed.
At each visit to the house of Reynolds these men represented themselves
as horse hunters. In a few days after the last visit, Reynolds with one of his
sons and a negro boy, started to Shreveport with his cotton, and stopped to
camp about fifteen miles from his home. While arranging for the night, the
two men, Seekers and Wells, passed and were recognized by Reynolds' son,
who informed his father that they were the men who had been to his house
horse-hunting. Reynolds called to them and asked if they had found their

Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857. Fort Worth, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/. Accessed September 20, 2014.