History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857

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road;
another on the San Augustine road under Colonel Morman, and the
other under Sandford on the Sand Hill road. Our horses were left tied in the
head of a hollow, about one-half mile from Morman's, on the San Augustine
road. Where Morman was placed, about one-half mile from Shelbyville,
the young pines were too thick to see any distance; the orders were to
wait until the foremost men reached Morman and then all to fire on the
line of men who would be in ten feet of them. They came along; Morman's
gun failed to fire and the next man took his place. Haley's gun was struck in
the lock and fired by the shot, and Haley lost his hat. When Lieut. Boulware
crossed the road he got Haley's hat. New blankets and provisions were
scattered in the road. The company then fired into the line and the
moderators ran. They went in the direction of Sandford's company, except
Haley, who ran straight on into Shelbyville. Sandford's guns missed fire
and the moderators scattered and went to their main body. The
regulators retired to their horses, sent information back to the command and
waited for re-inforcements, expecting an attack, but no attack was made as the
moderators went into the Teneha swamp to make their escape. The number
killed and wounded in this affair was never ascertained. This was in or about
the month of September, 1842.
We remained at our camp, watching an opportunity to attack the moderators,
some eight or ten days, having occasional skirmishes with small bodies
of the enemy. In one instance we went with a few men near the house of Mr.
Shoat, a few shots were fired and some of the enemy wounded. On the side of
the regulators there were no injuries. In this camp we remained receiving
information and advice from friends in San Augustine, until the day the militia
arrived, when we were disbanded and all returned to their homes.
At a meeting of the regulators I made a motion that the different counties
of the Republic be notified of what was going on with us and advised to
organize, arm and protect themselves. The letters were written by Colonel
Morman and C. T. Hilliard, and being received by these counties had a strong
effect. Upon this action the moderators called upon General Houston, president
of the Republic, and urged him to call out the militia, and stated that their
numbers had been reduced from two hundred and thirty to sixty-five and that
was their number when surrounded by the regulators in the thicket, after the
battle at Hilliards. General Houston anticipating the approach of Santa
Anna, and believing the discord between the citizens would enabl3 Santa Anna
to overrun the country, called out the militia, and placing them, to the number
of 1500 men, under the command of General James Smith, sent them to Shelby
county, when upon their arrival, the citizens laid aside their arms and went
home, and ended the war between the regulators and the moderators.

Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857. Fort Worth, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/. Accessed September 16, 2014.