History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857

-26

CHAPTER
X.
I had gone into Louisiana with some friends, but returned to aid in the
interment of Howell Hudson. We buried him with military honors, firing a
platoon over his grave. We made preparations to leave after filling the grave,
when it was proposed that we hunt for Henry Strickland, thinking he could be
found that night. We started and soon discovered the tracks of the horse rode
by the spy of the moderators. We chased him five miles but he escaped.
Going on further we met Colonel Morman, who invited the men into a grocery
and treated them. We took an old road, going to the Strickland settlement,
and met the old man Morman and Washington Parrish driving a yoke of oxen
in full run; they told us to turn back that the militia were at Hilliard's and
eighty men were coming in our direction. We did not wish to be found with
arms in our hands and we turned and went back past the grocery. Nine of our
men stopped, as by this time, they wanted more liquor. We turned then to
cross the river at Logansport, so as to be in Louisiana. One company of
militia stopped at my house, got some provisions and inquired for me; they
were coming up to unite with the others. Colonel Morman going alone in the
direction of Logansport, met this company and they took him prisoner. One
of the Horton's was in this company and attempted to shoot Morman, but
Morman seeing it, was ready and made an effort to fire, but they were prevented
by the militia. Colonel Morman was deprived of his weapons and his blowing
horn would have been taken, but he claimed it was not a weapon and it was
restored to him. While the militia were standing with Morman, we rode up,
and discovering who they were, we turned and made our escape. Tom Stanford
ran far ahead and we did not see him till next day. That night we crossed the
Sabine river. Colonel Morman was taken to Dave Strickland's and from there
scouts were sent about the country. These men, of the militia, finding everything
so different from what had been represented, that they informed their
commanding officer, General Smith, that they must be disbanded, or they would,
in a body, join Colonel Morman to rid the country of counterfeiters, thieves and
other lawless men. The next day the militia was disbanded and all returned
to their homes, except one company which was retained and stationed for a
a short time in Shelbyville, to maintain law and order. One of the company
raised a difficulty with Albert Harris, a regulator, and attempted to kill him, but
finding Harris ready for the conflict he ran and concealed himself. Vardeman
Duncan, a moderator, then took up the difficulty against Harris. Duncan
advanced upon him with a knife, when Harris, to get advantage in law, retreated
a few steps, then fired and missed; Duncan still pursued with his knife, when
Harris fired a second time and killed Duncan. Then that company of militia
was discharged.
John M. Bradley tried to procure the killing of Colonel Wat Morman, and
he, (Bradley) left home and went to San Augustine, still continuing to threaten
the life of Morman. Colonel Morman finding he was compelled to fight, took

I

Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857. Fort Worth, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/. Accessed April 18, 2015.