History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857

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Reynolds and David Winborn with him and went to San Augustine.
There they found Bradley in church, attending a meeting. Morman entered
the church and set facing Bradley. He had been seen by Bradley and before
the conclusion of the services, he (Morman) went out and stood on the gallery,
at the door of the church. Bradley came out at the close surrounded by a
crowd of women. Morman had dreamed that Bradley wore a steel jacket and
as Bradley came out Morman cried, "Clear the track, Wat's here!" at the same
moment aimed and fired at Bradley, just below where he thought the steel
jacket would come. Bradley fired also. Bradley was killed; his ball struck at
Morman's feet. It was found afterwards that Bradley wore a steel jacket, and
he had been shot below it. Morman surrendered to the authorities of San
Augustine county, was tried and acquitted. The defense being the threats made
by Bradley and his offer of one thousand dollars to any one who would kill
Colonel Morman.
CHAPTER XI.
The freebooters who belonged to the party of the moderators were Willis
Watson, Tiger Jim Strickland, Amos Strickland, Henry Strickland, Dave Strickland,
Sam McFadgin and his three sons, William, Baily and John J. Goodbread,
Jno. Smith, Sam Todd, John Appelgate, Jno. M. Bradley, Bob Clifford, Baily
Anderson, Jonas English, Joshua English, Emory Raines, chief counsellor.
I was so much annoyed by my enemies in Shelby county, by being waylaid,
my horses poisoned, etc., and was kept so much disturbed that I left Shelby
county in 1851 and settled twelve miles west of Jordan's Saline, in the county
of VanZandt. I took my remaining stock with me. Here I traded my horses
for a large stock of hogs, keeping only one mare. And during my absence from
home Rusk McInturf, with his clan, stole my whole stock of hogs and escaped
with them.
In 1854 I bought another stock of hogs, intending to move my whole stock
to the Brazos, and going to collect them, found them all gone again. What I
could find of my hogs, horses and cattle, I took with me to the Horse Shoe
bend of Brazos river, in Parker county.
CHAPTER XII.
In 1856 I moved my stock to the head of Kickapoo creek in Erath county.
Here they did well until the close of the late civil war. In 1855 I lived in Big
Valley above the Horse-Shoe Bend of the Brazos river in Parker county. There
myself and family were sick. At one time I was in want of breadstuff, and
learning that a wagon load of flour and whiskey had arrived at the house of a
man named Sanchez, living in the neighborhood, I went to the place to procure
what I required when I met a man by the name of Walker, who had waylaid me
in Shelby county. I got my flour and was about to start home, when Walker
stepped up, caught me in the bosom with his left hand, in his right hand, raised

Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857. Fort Worth, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/. Accessed August 23, 2014.