History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857

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his head, he held a dangerous knife. He accused me of going with Col.
Mormon to waylay and kill him. I was unarmed and unsuspicious of a difficulty
in going to the place. I knocked his hand loose from my bosom, and pressed
close to him with my face to his looking him in the eye; he shut his eyes, closed
his knife, put it in his pocket and walked away. He went into Sanchez's house
and the crowd inside hearing the loud talk came out hurriedly. Sanchez met
Walker at the fence, Walker gave him his bridle reins to hold and went into the
house and came out again immediately without any more weapons. Coming to
the fence he got another cup of whiskey and desired me to drink with him; I
told him I would not drink with any such man, and any man who accused me
of going with Col. Mormon to waylay him or any one else was a liar and no
gentleman, that he (Walker) belonged to one party and I to another, but I had
never taken advantage of any one. He then invited me to go home with him,
but I refused. He then proposed to go home with me. I answered that he
could go where he pleased that I should not go with him. About that time
Phillis Stroud came up, and I went on with Stroud who lived near me. When
we started Walker went with us and affecting to be very drunk fell from his
horse and went no further.
CHAPTER XIII.
After this efforts were made to raise a difficulty between Walker and myself.
People were afraid of him and thought him a desperado. I was urged to fight
him but I was not to be decoyed into trouble.
A party was given at old man Pointers, two miles above me on Kickapoo
creek. Walker, together with the basest characters, male and female, of the
country, was there. I was about a mile from Pointer's at J. W. White's, getting
a load of rails, when Walker with six men came to "wind me up." Mohorn
came with Walker, both armed. The doors of White's house were east and
west. They came up on the south side. The other men, seven in all, surrounded
the house two at a side. I went out into the yard as they came in at the east
door. There were only two men, White and Rightman, at the house when they
saw me. I was unarmed except a derringer in my belt. As I stepped out they
asked me for a drink of water. I spoke to White and said "these men want
water, I am too well raised to hand such men water, you can do as you please."
White brought the water. Walker was dismounting from his horse, and it was
handed to Mohorn. Walker said "Mr. Middleton, I would like to have a civil
chat with you." I told him to "go ahead, I'll talk to you or any one else." He
answered he wanted a private chat. I said "go ahead, I will follow." White
had just erected a little smoke-house and it was not quite finished. Walker
started around and getting near the corner near a pile of lumber I told him to
stop, right there we would settle it. I had my hand on my pistol and was ready
for him. Walker dropped at once, and sitting down before me, said he would
make any acknowledgements I wished. I told him I wanted no difficulty and
feared none, I was always ready when one came up, but rather avoided it and

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Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857. Fort Worth, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/. Accessed December 26, 2014.