History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857

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on
the spot; following the trail we overtook them just before sundown. We
divided and came up on different sides of the encampment, when Choctaw Tom
came out and told us they were there peaceably to hunt and wished to do no
one harm. I answered that the Indians of the reserve were accused of horse
stealing and that much of it was going on in the country. He said it was by
wild Indians. I answered we did not know wild Indians from tame ones and
they had better get away, that I was hunting the Indians who were doing the
mischief and they had shot at two men and I had tracked them to that camp.
An old laughing Indian (one who laughs all the time) said he had shot at a deer
and not at them. Choctaw Tom promised to take the Indians back at once to
the lower reserve where they belonged. I left them and returned next morning.
They left that day, but went into Palo Pinto county and stopped again. Peter
Garland discovered they were there, raised a company and went against them.
He went to their camp and dividing his command approached them in two
divisions. One party made an immediate attack and killed several Indians; two
of the attacking party were killed. The other division fired one round, retired
to reload and failed to return.
CHAPTER XV.
The next difficulty was in the same year, 1857. A party of Indians came
and killed a man named Browning. They came from the upper reserve This
man Browning, was in the woods below Baylor's ranch and fought the Indians
alone for some time and killed one. When charged with this crime it was
attributed by them to wild Indians. Jno. R. and George Baylor were then
absent. On their return they determined to avenge the death of Browning, and
taking four men went on the frontier to a point on the Indian trail which the
Indians would pass on their return They stopped and during a consultation
they saw two Indians coming, who retreated before the men could get ready to
follow on horseback. One of the Indians was shot and killed, the other escaped.
The white men then went to another trail where they met six Indians; fighting
commenced at once and every Indian was killed. One of the Indians, wounded
in the beginning, protected himself behind a rock and was the last killed. After
this fight and on the same day, they moved and came up in the rear of seven
Indians They were accompanied by a chief who wore a wig with a wide
leathern strap hanging from it to his feet, and this adorned with silver plates at
intervals. Jno. R. Baylor told his party to notice him knock off one of the plates;
he fired knocked off the plate and wounded the Indian. They then charged
the Indians. One of the Indians jumped up behind the chief to carry him away,
but was shot down. They killed three then, the chief died afterwards. The
others escaped temporarily by hiding in the drift of a creek near by, but being
discovered were killed, making thirteen that day. They then went to the camp
of the rangers, which was in the neighborhood, as they were nearly out of
ammunition. The rangers now went to look for Indians but found none; they
found the body of the chief and sent the strap with the silver plates to Col. Baylor.

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Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857. Fort Worth, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/. Accessed August 20, 2014.