History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857

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side of the village, a bluff on the west side and a pond of lasting water at
the foot of the bluff on the westside Baylor halted until Captain Hamner
could coime up after watering his horses in the pond. He marched the length
of the company in the water and when the horses had drank countermarched to
the rear. We saw only one Indian, who came running through the village. He
was surrounded; Hamner ran up beside him and went with him to Baylor.
Baylor spoke to him in several different Indian dialects, but he exhibited no
*knowledge of any. The Indian was between Hamner and Baylor, each having
his gun in the saddle across his lap. Baylor took the Indian's gun and spat in
the pan. The Indian letting go his gun, jerked Hamner's, but he held it fast and
shot the Indian with his six shooter. The Indian then started forward and was
again fired upon and killed. The Indians then raised a general yell, fired a full
volley at us from the mountain, started to make a charge and tried to take
possession of a ravine in our front, but finding it occupied by our troops,
retreated. A few miles further on, we reached a mesquit flat-a post oak ridge
a mile long was on our right and we had to go around the south end of it.
Baylor staying in the rear, sent me with the colors to the point of the ridge.
Captain Scantland was sent across the ridge to enclose any Indians found there.
After I had passed the ridge a short distance, we were fired into from the ridge
by the Indians; no one hurt. I ordered a charge of the men with me. A man
named Cook, close to me, ran too fast and was too close to the Indians, when
he was wounded by one of our men and died next day. After the Indians got
out in the rear of Captain Scantland, we halted at the point of the ridge until
we could bring in Cook. We carried him to the house of WVm. Marlin, about
half a mile off. At Marlin's a branch heads east and runs past his house and
turns west, and a mountain is southeast of Marlin's. Here the regular soldiers
and Indians came up behind the mountain. An Indian of the Annadako tribe
was in command. I knew his voice when I heard him giving directions. We
staked out our horses and prepared for fight. It was about 2 p. Im.; we expected
an attack before sundown. The Indians came before we expected them and
raised their warhoop. We formed our lines in such positions as we thought
best. Hamner's company formed near me and I fell in with that company.
We marched up the west side of the branch where collected the enemiy-the
Indians and regulars. After marching a few hundred yards I saw a position
from which I thought I could kill an Indian and placed myself near a post
oak. I supposed some Indian would come down the branch to obtain some
advantage and I would surprise him. A boy of the command took a similar
position near me. A squad of men had advanced about two hundred yards to
the top of the hill on my right and the battle was going on. Baylor came by and
ordered me to take command of the squad on the hill, and on my arrival the firing
ceased. The men informed me they had seen three Indians fall from their
horses. In a few minutes Colonel Baylor came up to me and said: "Let's go
and bring in our horses and put them under guard." I then went back, got our
horses and ordered the guard to bring in all, which was done, and I returned to

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Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857. Fort Worth, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/. Accessed July 24, 2014.