History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857

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much anxiety on the part of the men lest they should call upon themselves
the anger and force of the United States. One company having arranged
to leave that night left their horses saddled and intended going off in
small parties past the guard, mounting their horses and leaving. Other companies
perceiving that some of the horses were left with their saddles on did
the same, and during the night so much confusion resulted from the number of
horses saddled and men meeting men who were not informed of the intention
that the design was betrayed and no one left. In the night Baylor trebled the
guard and ordered any man shot who offered to pass the lines. In the morning
I took the colors and called for volunteers Hamner with his company
came first, and finally all came forward except Sutton's company from Weatherford
which refused to proceed further and returned home. We then moved
on towards the upper reserve, when meeting with the command of Ward we
halted, ate dinner and then the whole command returned to the lower reserve.
Baylor went to his ranch. Garland had left with his company and gone down
the east side of the Brazos river to the lower reserve where all were collecting.
After the men had collected and arrangements were making for a campaign, a
compromise was made and the war against the reserve Indians ceased. The
Texans returned to their homes. In the last fight mentioned above the Indians
lost twenty-two who were killed and died of their wounds. The Texans lost
three killed. In the morning after our arrival at Baylor's ranch, eight of us
having gone there, I rose very early as was my custom and went out to move
my horse, he was staked low down in the field near the river, and where, unknown
to me, was a ford. Dr. Barkley, Howell and Clark stopped to wash
their faces before moving their horses; the others were not yet out of bed. I
was returning from my horse and the three men were untying the ropes from
the stakes when I heard horses moving, and looking back saw Maj. Neighbors
and nineteen Indians charging upon me not distant more than fifty yards. The
men commenced hollooing, "Help! help! 'Indians, Indians!" I had called
their attention by calling to them. "Look out, boys, the Indians are coming."
Baylor came out and said they are white men as they have on citizen's clothes.
I replied they were Indians, when Baylor called up the men. I covered the retreat
of Howell and Clark by threatening them with my gun, but Dr. Barkley
was captured. He was carried a short distance and after they had taken from
him three gold dollars and his pen-knife he was permitted to return. The United
States authorities and the citizens assembled at the lower reserve agreed
upon the removal of the Indians to Fort Cobb, when the people satisfied with
the agreement disbanded and returned to their homes. We were then at peace
with the Indians and for twelve months after but little mischief was done.

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Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857. Fort Worth, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/. Accessed December 25, 2014.