History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857

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men
swam it that the Indians had been there and captured some horses. The
river was up and the Indians swam it and went on to Golconda in Palo Pinto
county. There a company of cow hunters came up with them, captured seventeen
of the horses and the red skins escaped with only the horses they were
riding. I went home and gathering a crowd went at once to the head of Sunday
creek valley expecting the return of the Indians. I reached the east side of
the valley before sundown and took a station to watch, but I was a few minutes
too late, the Indians had passed. Next morning about sunrise we struck the
trail and ran the savages across the head of Puluxey creek and some distance
down the Leon river. We camped on the Leon, rain commenced falling and
as we could not trail them we hastened back to Stephenville, and there learned
that a company had met them the evening before at Duffau mountain, and that
the Indians had left there and gone in the direction of my house. We hurried
home and had not yet struck the trail. Tom Killen lived near the river, and in
going home saw the trail but he was alone and the Indians too long gone to try
to follow. In this raid the Indians were so closely pursued that they got
nothing.
The horses captured from the Indians at Golconda were staked out there
by the cow hunters, and the Indians on their return went by and stole them
again. The next morning the cow hunters discovered their loss and gave chase
immediately. They followed until their horses were jaded and then met with
another party of cow hunters on fresh horses. They took the trail and followed
until evening when they overtook them seventy miles from Golconda. This
pursuit was made in the part of one day. The Indians were bivouacked on the
top of a mountain drying their blankets and jerking their meat in the sun. The
cow men were discovered by an Indian sentinel on the side of the mountain,
and the Indians mounted and started to run. A small Indian riding a very
slow horse had the scalp of Phillips and wore his hat, a large Indian remained
to assist him Two Indians on swift horses endeavored to divert the attention
of the cow men but without success. The white men kept steadily after the
small and large Indians. The small one having been killed the other ran but
was caught and shot. He died soon after in the brush. The other two
escaped.
CHAPTER XVIII.
Some time after this Wm. Culver was with his scouts watching for Indians
on Saline creek in Palo Pinto county. Two men were posted on high mountains
to watch the Indian trail. Culver and his men were in the valley. The
signal was given that the Indians were coming. Culver and Ross dashed after
them. There were but two and being overtaken by Culver and Ross a handto-hand
fight took place. One Indian was killed, the other wounded. The
wounded Indian when the other was killed jumped into the saddle upon Culver's
horse and made his escape. They had dismounted to fight and Culver's

Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857. Fort Worth, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/. Accessed October 23, 2014.