History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857

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CHAPTER
XIX.
Not long after I was informed about dark of the inroad of another party of
Indians. I went out by moonlight to bring in my horses and found a fine mule
and a cavallado horse gone. Next day I found the trail and saw where a man
had walked in his socks without shoes to where my horses and been in the
prairie at the head of a ravine. Here from the sign the Indians had indulged
themselves in a dance. They got away with the horses. In about a week
I struck a trail and my mule track was there going west, the Indians before
had gone east. In about a mile of my house I found where the mule and horses
had been grazed. In eight or ten days I saw the same trail going east. With
Cunningham I trailed them on the range all day; we then followed the trail
to the mouth of Robertson creek where it was lost by getting among loose
horses. Not long before the break-up of the late civil war, Captain Jackson
with his company from Missouri came by my house on the way to California,
deserting from the Confederate army. They helped themselves to horses or
whatever else they wanted as they passed. They camped for dinner near my
house and had with them my mule which had been stolen by the Indians. I
was absent at the time and my wife claimed the mule and before she could get
out of the house to go to the mule a man had mounted it and was gone, and
the mule was lost. In 1863 twenty-five Indians came in on Leon. Flannagan
and Smith who had been living on the head of Leon river moved to McCain's
ranch on Palo Pinto creek. Flannagan sent his son and Smith back with an
ox team and covered wagon after their household goods when they were attacked.
Smith escaped on foot through the brush of the Leon, after he had
been wounded in the leg by an arrow before he got out of the wagon. Flannagan
got out of the wagon and fought until he was killed.
A man with a woman mounted on the horse behind him was riding near a
house when attacked by the same band of Indians last mentioned. He would
threaten with his gun, the Indians retreat the man then spur forward, and this
repeated until his cries brought assistance from the house when the Indians
left them. The woman received several arrows in the hips but she recovered.
In 1864 I started alone to go to Stephenville riding a three-year-old colt not
bridlewise. I learned in the town that the Indians were in the country again
and a scout had gone in the direction of my house. I found Mart Stone who
was going towards my house; he was traveling with his wagon to Hunt county
and had a boy with him. A scout was preparing to leave Stephenville, but as
they were slow in starting Stone, the boy and I went on. We went together
about three miles, and then I went on alone. About five miles from town I
saw some men sitting on their horses about half a mile from the road. I went
forward and came to a place which for some distance hid me from the party.
I concluded to make an examination and see who they were and rode up the
bank. As I was going up I saw two Indians rise up and peer over at me. I
turned instantly and ran towards Stephenville. The Indians were riding race

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Middleton, John W. History of the regulators and moderators and the Shelby County war in 1841 and 1842, in the republic of Texas, with facts and incidents in the early history of the republic and state, from 1837 to the annexation, together with incidents of frontier life and Indian troubles, and the war on the reserve in Young County in 1857. Fort Worth, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth2362/. Accessed October 21, 2014.