[Salad of micro vegetables]

Description:

Close-up of an organic salad made of micro vegetables.

Thanks to a new combined organic and artisan technique with technology, Mexican grower Salvador Huiza waters, sows, and cuts thousands of micro vegetables in a matter of hours in the greenhouse where he works north of Fort Worth, Texas.

The harvest of these miniature vegetables, obtained through a procedure where water and earth are used without pesticides, is drawing the attention of restaurants and markets in the area.

"The difference is specifically in the flavor; it is much more concentrated than conventional vegetables,” Huiza points out. For a few months he is in charge of the growth of more than 20 varieties of miniature vegetables in the greenhouse Greens Genes.

Creator(s): Castillo, José L.
Location(s): United States - Texas - Tarrant County - Fort Worth
Creation Date: August 28, 2006
Partner(s):
UNT Archives
Collection(s):
José L. Castillo Photograph Collection
Usage:
Total Uses: 5
Past 30 days: 0
Yesterday: 0
Creator (Photographer):
Castillo, José L.

Jose L. Castillo is a news correspondent for the Spanish language EFE News Service, the fourth largest news wire in the world. A native of Peru, Mr. Castillo studied translation and interpretation at the Escuela de Traduccion e Interpretacion de Lima (ESIT) in the early 1990s before completing English studies at the University of Newcastle, England. He has worked for various newspapers -- as editor, columnist, reporter or media advisor -- in Georgia, Texas, Florida, New York, Illinois, and California, and Peru and is an award-winning journalist.

Date(s):
  • Creation: August 28, 2006
  • Digitized: March 12, 2007
Coverage:
Place
United States - Texas - Tarrant County - Fort Worth
Era
Into Modern Times, 1939-Present
Date
August 28, 2006
Description:

Close-up of an organic salad made of micro vegetables.

Thanks to a new combined organic and artisan technique with technology, Mexican grower Salvador Huiza waters, sows, and cuts thousands of micro vegetables in a matter of hours in the greenhouse where he works north of Fort Worth, Texas.

The harvest of these miniature vegetables, obtained through a procedure where water and earth are used without pesticides, is drawing the attention of restaurants and markets in the area.

"The difference is specifically in the flavor; it is much more concentrated than conventional vegetables,” Huiza points out. For a few months he is in charge of the growth of more than 20 varieties of miniature vegetables in the greenhouse Greens Genes.

Physical Description:

1 photograph : col.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Added Title: Slow Food
Series Title: Community: Slow Food
Partner:
UNT Archives
Collection:
José L. Castillo Photograph Collection
Identifier:
  • LOCAL-CONT-NO: 10 MICROGREENS TEXAS
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metapth24030
Resource Type: Photograph
Format: Image
Rights:
Access: Public