A thumb-nail history of the city of Houston, Texas, from its founding in 1836 to the year 1912

74 A THUMB-NAnL HISTORY OF
teen miles of track in its yards here. These yards
have a capacity of 1,500 cars. Forty-three men are
employed in the car department of the shops here
and nine men are employed in the round house,
which has six stalls. In the yards there are fortyfive
men employed. Five switch engines are used
in the yards constantly. The water tanks of this
company here have a capacity of 100,000 gallons
and the coal chutes forty tons.
The San Antonio and Aransas Pass has a yard
track mileage of thirteen miles. Over 1,100 cars
can be accommodated in them and three switch
engines are necessary to handle the business. Nineteen
men are employed in the yards. This company
maintains a freight depot here, but its passenger
trains enter the Southern Pacific depot. This company
is also closely allied to the Southern Pacific
and can touch most of the local industrial plants
on the Harriman tracks.
All the other lines entering this city operate very
little yard trackage, but have agreements with some
one of these roads. The Galveston, Houston and
Henderson and the Santa Fe both have small
stretches of track here, but the mileage is small.
It must not be supposed that land transportation
occupied the attention of the early Houstonians to
the exclusion of everything else. Water transportation
was given a great deal of attention, though
in that direction not so much was required. There
was plenty of water in the bayou to float the largest
steamboats of that day, but there were one or two

Young, Samuel Oliver. A thumb-nail history of the city of Houston, Texas, from its founding in 1836 to the year 1912. Houston, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24649/. Accessed December 25, 2014.