Welcome Sign & Lookout Tower: 1929

Description:

The WELCOME sign was donated to the city of Mineral Wells in 1922 by George Holmgren, President of the Texas Rotary Club, in appreciation for the hospitality extended the Rotary Club at its State Convention in Mineral Wells that year.
The caption on the photograph reads: "Reputed to be the largest Non-commercial electric sign in U.S." East Mountain was a popular place for viewing the city, especially for photographers. The lookout tower atop West Mountain (above the WELCOME sign) was destroyed by a tornado in 1930.
The Welcome Sign was built by Holmgren in his San Antonio Iron Works in 1922. He gave the sign to the people of Mineral Wells with the understanding that they would maintain the sign and the many light bulbs required to light it.
The Mineral Wells Jaycees later replaced the light bulbs with lower-maintenance red neon lights. A Warrant Officer Club Company from Fort Wolters moved the sign from East Mountain in 1972 to the east side of Bald Mountain, where it remains today [2008], lighted with flood lights at its base.
It is reported that this sign inspired D.W. Griffith, to promote possibly the most recognizable landmark in the US, the HOLLYWOOD sign in California, following his visit to Mineral Wells in 1928. Griffith, Producer/Director of the early movie classic, "Birth of a Nation," also produced the "Keystone Kops" comedies.
The house in the foreground was the home of druggist Dr. C.F. Yeager. Also in the picture, about half-way up the mountain, is the water tower supplying mineral water to the then new Baker Hotel.
The object in the upper-left-hand corner of the picture invites speculation.

Creator(s): Unknown
Location(s): United States - Texas - Palo Pinto County - Mineral Wells
Creation Date: 1929  
Partner(s):
Boyce Ditto Public Library
Collection(s):
A. F. Weaver Collection
Usage:
Total Uses: 388
Past 30 days: 8
Yesterday: 0
Creator:
Unknown
Date(s):
  • Creation: 1929
  • Digitized: October 30, 2006
Coverage:
Place
United States - Texas - Palo Pinto County - Mineral Wells
Era
New South, Populism, Progressivism, and the Great Depression, 1877-1939
Date
1929  
Description:

The WELCOME sign was donated to the city of Mineral Wells in 1922 by George Holmgren, President of the Texas Rotary Club, in appreciation for the hospitality extended the Rotary Club at its State Convention in Mineral Wells that year.
The caption on the photograph reads: "Reputed to be the largest Non-commercial electric sign in U.S." East Mountain was a popular place for viewing the city, especially for photographers. The lookout tower atop West Mountain (above the WELCOME sign) was destroyed by a tornado in 1930.
The Welcome Sign was built by Holmgren in his San Antonio Iron Works in 1922. He gave the sign to the people of Mineral Wells with the understanding that they would maintain the sign and the many light bulbs required to light it.
The Mineral Wells Jaycees later replaced the light bulbs with lower-maintenance red neon lights. A Warrant Officer Club Company from Fort Wolters moved the sign from East Mountain in 1972 to the east side of Bald Mountain, where it remains today [2008], lighted with flood lights at its base.
It is reported that this sign inspired D.W. Griffith, to promote possibly the most recognizable landmark in the US, the HOLLYWOOD sign in California, following his visit to Mineral Wells in 1928. Griffith, Producer/Director of the early movie classic, "Birth of a Nation," also produced the "Keystone Kops" comedies.
The house in the foreground was the home of druggist Dr. C.F. Yeager. Also in the picture, about half-way up the mountain, is the water tower supplying mineral water to the then new Baker Hotel.
The object in the upper-left-hand corner of the picture invites speculation.

Physical Description:

1 photograph : b&w

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): Welcome Sign | Lookout Tower
Partner:
Boyce Ditto Public Library
Collection:
A. F. Weaver Collection
Identifier:
  • LOCAL-CONT-NO: AWO_1108P
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metapth25067
Resource Type: Photograph
Format: Image
Rights:
Access: Public