[407 E. Kolstad - Mallard Alexander House]

Description:

Photograph of a light-colored house surrounded by a lawn and trees.

One of the oldest homes in Palestine, this house was built using slave labor in 1848 by Judge John B. Mallard. Surrounded by stately oak and cedar trees, it continues to be on its original foundation of one and one-half foot cedar logs and has been repaired and remodeled by later owners. Marked by the State of Texas n 1952, it has been the home of the Forrest Bradberrys since 1957. Judge Mallard and his wife, the former Susan S. Scott, came to Texas from Mississippi in 1845 and settled at Old Fort Houston. In February 1846, he moved to Palestine, the new county seat of Anderson County which had been organized that same year, and purchased ten acres, known as the Mallard Block. This acreage was located just north of the then city limits which is now in Old Town Palestine. The Mallards had seven children including Mrs. Bettie Oder, a beloved teacher in Palestine for forty-six years. Mrs. Oder was born at this home in 1849 and died in Houston in 1940. Also born here was Mrs. Barbara Alexander Eppner. The first census of early Palestine was compiled n 1848 by Mrs. John Mallard, and included the families living in the original town site, a total of 148 whites and 31 negro slaves. Judge Mallard, the first lawyer to practice in Palestine, served as a member of the Fifth Texas Legislature, and was the second Chief Justice of Anderson County. In 1852, he formed a law partnership with Judge William Alexander and Judge John H. Reagan. In 1854, Judge Mallard died and on March 8, 1857, his widow married Judge Alexander. Judge William Alexander, born in Scotland on September 10, 1814, came to Galveston in 1850 and on to Palestine. In 1860, shortly before the outbreak of the War between the States, he was appointed by Governor Sam Houston to be Chief Justice of Anderson County and served until 1865. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, helped establish the first public school in Palestine and served on the first school board. Judge William Alexander died in January 1872 and is buried in the Old Palestine Cemetery near his former law partner, Judge John Mallard.

Creator(s): Unknown
Location(s): United States - Texas - Anderson County - Palestine
Creation Date: c. 1950  
Partner(s):
Palestine Public Library
Collection(s):
Rescuing Texas History, 2007
Usage:
Total Uses: 102
Past 30 days: 4
Yesterday: 0
Creator:
Unknown
Date(s):
  • Creation: c. 1950
  • Digitized: May 24, 2007
Coverage:
Place
United States - Texas - Anderson County - Palestine
Era
Into Modern Times, 1939-Present
Description:

Photograph of a light-colored house surrounded by a lawn and trees.

One of the oldest homes in Palestine, this house was built using slave labor in 1848 by Judge John B. Mallard. Surrounded by stately oak and cedar trees, it continues to be on its original foundation of one and one-half foot cedar logs and has been repaired and remodeled by later owners. Marked by the State of Texas n 1952, it has been the home of the Forrest Bradberrys since 1957. Judge Mallard and his wife, the former Susan S. Scott, came to Texas from Mississippi in 1845 and settled at Old Fort Houston. In February 1846, he moved to Palestine, the new county seat of Anderson County which had been organized that same year, and purchased ten acres, known as the Mallard Block. This acreage was located just north of the then city limits which is now in Old Town Palestine. The Mallards had seven children including Mrs. Bettie Oder, a beloved teacher in Palestine for forty-six years. Mrs. Oder was born at this home in 1849 and died in Houston in 1940. Also born here was Mrs. Barbara Alexander Eppner. The first census of early Palestine was compiled n 1848 by Mrs. John Mallard, and included the families living in the original town site, a total of 148 whites and 31 negro slaves. Judge Mallard, the first lawyer to practice in Palestine, served as a member of the Fifth Texas Legislature, and was the second Chief Justice of Anderson County. In 1852, he formed a law partnership with Judge William Alexander and Judge John H. Reagan. In 1854, Judge Mallard died and on March 8, 1857, his widow married Judge Alexander. Judge William Alexander, born in Scotland on September 10, 1814, came to Galveston in 1850 and on to Palestine. In 1860, shortly before the outbreak of the War between the States, he was appointed by Governor Sam Houston to be Chief Justice of Anderson County and served until 1865. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, helped establish the first public school in Palestine and served on the first school board. Judge William Alexander died in January 1872 and is buried in the Old Palestine Cemetery near his former law partner, Judge John Mallard.

Physical Description:

1 photograph : negative, b&w ; 4 x 5 in.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): houses | Mallard Alexander
Partner:
Palestine Public Library
Collection:
Rescuing Texas History, 2007
Identifier:
  • LOCAL-CONT-NO: 33619002101333
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metapth26529
Resource Type: Photograph
Format: Image
Rights:
Access: Public