The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane

x INTRODUCTION.
The city rose from its ruins as if by magic. Street after
street was cleared of debris. A small army of men worked from
early morn until the shadows of night descended, to lift the city
from its burden of wreckage. Then, when danger of epidemic
seemed passed, attention was turned to commerce. The bay was
strewn with stranded vessels. Monster ocean steamers weighing
thousands of tons had been picked up like toys, driven across the
lowlands, and thrown far from their moorings. One big steamship
was hurled through three bridges, another, weighing 4,000
tons, was carried twenty-two miles from deep water, and dashed
against a bayou bluff in another county.
The great wharves and warehouses along the bay front were a
mass of splintered, broken timbers.
But the mighty energy of man worked wonders. Marvelous
to say, under such conditions, a bridge 2 % miles long was built
across the bay within seven days and Galveston, which had been
cut off from the world, was once more in active touch with all the
marts of trade and commerce. An undaunted people strove as
only an indomitable people can strive, to rehabilitate the city.
The signs of the cripple are still upon the city, but every
hour brings nearer the day when the crutches will be thrown
away and Galveston, which by nature and by man was chosen as
the entreport for the great West, will rise to a loftier destiny and
a more enduring commercial prosperity than seemed possible
before she was tried in the crucible of disaster. Longfellow says:
Our lot is the common lot of all.
Into each life some rain must fall,
Some days must be dark and dreary.
The dark and dreary.days were crowded into Galveston's life
with horror unspeakable. It is an inexorable law of nature that
after the storm comes the radiance of a glorious sunshine.

Lester, Paul. The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26719/. Accessed September 21, 2014.