The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane

FIRST NEWS OF THE GREAT CALAMITY. -. 21
road cannot get trains through to utilize the bridge across
the bay.
" Sabine Pass has not been heard from to-day (September 9th).
The last news was received from there yesterday morning, and at
that time the water was surrounding the old town at the pass, and
the wind was rising and the waves coming high. From the new
town, which is some distance back, the water had reached the
depot and was running through the streets. The people were
leaving for the high country, known as the Black Ridge, and it
is believed that all escaped. Two bodies have been brought in
from Seabrooke, on Galveston Bay, and seventeen persons are
missing there.
"In Houston the property damage is great, a conservative
estimate placing it at $250,000. The Merchants' and Planters'
Oil Mill was wrecked, entailing a loss of $40,000. The Dickson
Car Wheel Works suffered to the extent of $i6,ooo. The big
Masonic Temple, which is the property of the Grand Lodge of the
State, was partly wrecked. Nearly every church in the city was
damaged. The First Baptist, Southern Methodist and Trinity
Methodist, the latter a negro church, will have to be rebuilt before
they can be used again. Many business houses were unroofed.
MANY TOWNS DEMOLISHED.
" The residence portion of the town presents a dilapidated
appearance, but the damage in this part of the city has not been
so great as in some others. The streets are almost impassable
because of the litter of shade trees, fences, telephone wires and
poles. Much damage was done to window glass and furniture.
Many narrow escapes are recorded.
"t Another train has left here for Galveston, making the third
to-day. The two preceding ones have not been heard from,, as
all wires are prostrated.
"Meagre reports are arriving here from the country between
Houston and Galveston, along the line of the Santa Fe
Railroad. The tornado was the most destructive i the history
of the State,

Lester, Paul. The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26719/. Accessed July 9, 2014.