The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane

22 FIRST NEWS OF THE GREAT CALAMITY.
"The town of Alvin was practically demolished. Hitchcock
suffered severely from the storm, while the little town of
Alta Loma is reported without a house standing. The town of
Pearl has lost one-half of its buildings.
"L. B. Carlton, the president of the Business League of
Alvin, and a prominent merchant there, reports that not a build-i
ing is left standing in the town, either residence or business. i
Stocks of goods and house furniture are ruined, and crops
are a total loss. Alvin is a town of about 1200 inhabitants.
SANTA FE TRAIN BLOWN FROM THE TRACK.
"The Santa Fe train which left here at 7.55 Saturday night,
the 8th, was wrecked at a point about two miles north of Alvin.
The train was running slowly when it encountered the heavy
storm. It is reported that the train was literally lifted from the
track. "
A thrilling story was told by two men who floated across
from Galveston to the mainland. It came in the form of a telegram
received at Dallas f-om Houston:
" Relief train just returned. They could not get closer than
six miles of Virginia Point, where the prairie was covered with
lumber, debris, pianos, trunks, and dead bodies. Two hundred
corpses were counted from the train. A large steamer is stranded
two miles this side of Virginia Point, as though thrown up by a
tidal wave. Nothing can be seen of Galveston.
" Two men were picked up who floated across to the mainland,
who say they estimate the loss of life up to the time they left at
2000."
The above message was addressed to Superintendent Felton,
Dallas, and comes from Mr. Vaughn, manager of the Western
Union office at Houston. The Missouri, Kansas and Texas north
bound " flyer" was reported wrecked near Sayers.
The office of the Western Union Telegraph Company at St.
Louis was besieged with thousands of inquiries as to the extent
and result of tile terrible storm that cut off Galveston from communication
with the rest of the world. Rumors of the most dire-

Lester, Paul. The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26719/. Accessed September 22, 2014.