The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane

INCIDENTS OF THE AWFUL HURRICANE. 43
Galveston News' Clarence Owsley, manager Galveston Tribune."
The white cotton screw men's organization held a meeting
and tendered their services, that of 500 able bodied men, to the
public committee to clear the streets of debris. Big forces went
to work, and the. situation was much improved so far as the
passage of vessels was concerned. The city was patrolled byi
regular soldiers and citizen soldiery. No one was allowed on the
streets without a pass. Several negroes were shot for not halting
when ordered.
The steamer Lawrence arrived here early on the morning of
the i th, from Houston, with water and provisions. A committee
of one hundred citizens were aboard, among them being doctors
and cooks. W. G. Van Vleck, General Manager of the Southern
Pacific Railroad, arrived at the same time. He thought it would
be possible to establish mail service from Houston to Texas City
by night, with transfer boats to Galveston.
BODIES BEING BURIED IN TRENCHES.
It was found to be impossible to send bodies to sea for burial.
The water receded so far, however, that it was possible to dig
trenches, and bodies were being buried where found. Debris covering
bodies was being burned where it could be done safely.
Work on the water works was rushed, and it was hoped to be
able to turn a supply on in the afternoon.
Outside of Galveston smaller towns were beginning to send
in reports as telegraphic communication improved, and many
additions to the list of the dead and property losses were received.
Richmond and Hitchcock each reported sixteen lives lost. Alto
Loma, Arcadia, Velasco, Seabrooke, Belleville, Arcola and many
other towns had from one to eight dead. In most of these places
many houses were totally destroyed and thousands of head of live
stock killed.
The railroads alone suffered millions of dollars in actual
damage, to say nothing of the loss from stoppage of business.
The International and Great Northern and Santa Fe had miles of

Lester, Paul. The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26719/. Accessed July 23, 2014.