The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane

76 CRY OF DISTRESS IN GALVESTON.
commercial and naval necessities of the country." The Board consisted
of Lieutenant Colonels H. V. Roberts, G. L. Gillespie and
Jared A. Smith. The Board reported that Galveston was the most
eligible point for a deep harbor, but also called attention to the
harbors at Sabine and Aransas Passes as being worthy of consideration.
STORM TRAVELED OVER THREE THOUSAND MILES.
Under date of September I3th a prominent journal commented
as follows on the great storm:
" Fast disappearing into the Atlantic by way of Cape Breton
Island the great West Indian hurricane is passing into history so
far as the United States is concerned.
" For twelve days this storm has been under the surveillance
of the Weather Bureau. During this time it has traveled more
than 3,000 miles, and has described in its course a perfect parabola.
When the storm began its " swing around the circle " at Galveston
its intensity was greater than it has been since, although as it goes
to sea to-night it is reported to be again assuming terrific proportions.
" Its course now lies directly in the path of the North Atlantic
Liners, and what future destruction it may wreak remains to be
seen from reports of incoming vessels. Until the West Indian
hurricane made its appearance the United States had been for exactly
two months without a storm, which is the longest period on
record since the establishment of the Government Weather Bureau.
With the disappearance of this storm, another disturbance is reported
near the west Gulf coast, with an arm of barometic depression
extending northward into Western Tennessee."
NOT MEN ENOUGH TO HANDLE THE DEAD.
Further details of the great disaster were as follows: The citizens
of Galveston are straining every nerve to clear the ground
and secure from beneath the debris the bodies of human beings
and animals and to get rid of them. It is a task of great magnitude
and is attended with untold difficulties. There is a shortage

Lester, Paul. The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26719/. Accessed August 27, 2014.