Sweetwater Reporter (Sweetwater, Tex.), Vol. 47, No. 222, Ed. 1 Wednesday, September 27, 1944

....
. -
STEALS SHOW
LONDON (UP) — Marsh-
als and cabinet ministers
■ , were out in force to greet
Prime Minister Churchill
when he arrived in London
from the Quebec conference
yesterday.
But a red-headed little
boy stole the show.
The train from Churchill's
port of entry had hardly
ground to a halt when his
grandson, eight-year-old Jul-
ian Sandys, broke away
from his mother and fath-
er.
When the red-tabbed and
gold-braided big-wigs crowd-
ed 'into Churchill's coach
they found Julian firmly es-
tablished on grandfather's
lap, giving him a big wel-
coming kiss.
Independent Union
Is Eliminated By
War Labor Board
WASHINGTON (UP) — Em-
ployes of the Reed Roller Bit
Company at Houston have been
ordered to vote on their choice
of a CIO or Af of L union as
their collective bargaining agen-
cy.
The national labor relations
board announces that the two
contesting unions are the Unit-
ed Steelworkers, a CIO affiliate,
and the Houston Metal Trades
Council, an AFL affiliate.
The board held that the Bro-
therhood of Welders, Cutters and
Helpers of America — an inde-
pendent'union also seeking a
place on the ballot—is not an ap-
propriate unit for collective bar-
gaining.
WITH THE U. S. MAR-
INES ON PELELIU (UP)
—Absalom wasn't the only
guy whose whiskers got him
in trouble.
Recently a Navy photo-
grapher — Mason Pawlak
of Detroit, Mich. — crawled
back to his buddies with his
gun primed on a moustach-
ioed fellow in front of him.
"1 gotta Jap", he said,
"black moustache and all."
But the hairy one protest-
ed. He made so much noise
that Pawlak finally agreed
to look at his papers.
Sure enough—it was a
Marine.
When last seen, that
Marine was busy shaving
his upper lip.
i

Von Hinaenburg, the Kaiser and Ludendorff confer on a
point of strategy in World War I. ft was Ludendorff who
later helped bring: about (he Kaiser's abdication, rallied thr)
military clique that stabbed the German Republic in tito
back and paved the way for Nazism.
GERMANY WILL TRY IT AGAIN
By Sigrid Schultz 11114* liy Siirrld SclniWy,: nixlrliiiilctl l>y KEA Sitvii'e. Inc. .
As an American newspaper
correspondent in Berlin from
i 919 to 1941, Sigrid Schultz saw
at first hand the events that led
from World War I to World War
11. And she saw the behind-the-
scenes preparation for the com-
ing "war-iii-peace" that she
warr may culminate in World
War III, This is the story of
Germany's plans to win the
peace, plans that even now die
being pui into effect,
i * * *
II
W/'E do know, and we should
never forget, that the Ger-
man militarists consider us Ger-
many's principal enemy. Our
democracy is a symbol of hope to
the oppressed. As long as it sur-
vives, the nations the Germans
are determined to subdue will
never resign themselves to Ger-
man domination.
And we must draw the logical
conclusions from our knowledge,
calmly but quickly. As late as
the summer of 1943, German
propaganda still triumphed in the
belief of an appalling number ol
Americans and Britishers that the
mistakes of the Versailles Treaty
fathered the German aggressive
spirit which brought about the
Second World War.
Certainly the Treaty of Ver-
sailles was far from perfect. Cer-
tainly, too, the sufferings of the
German people were intense. But
only a. small fraction of that suf-
fering came from the terms of
the treaty. A great part of it
came as an aftermath of the war
itself and from the German mili-
tarists' determination to bootleg
Germany a new army.
But the Germans blamed us,
and our peace treaty. The more
sentimental of us echoed the
plaint. If we had not been so
unkind to the poor Germans at
Versailles, we said, they would
not have felt the need to rearm,
they would not have fallen prey
to a demagogue like Hitler. On
such lopsided, literally Jerry-built
logic, we based a whole theory
of war guilt, in which we were
both judfee and villain.
The truth is that German mili-
tarism never meant to give up the
fight when the German army sued
for armistice in 1918. It only went
under cover to lick its wounds.
Our alleged unkindness at Ver-
sailles had nothing whatever to
do with Germany's dedication to
another war and, should that war
fail, to still another.
The truth is that in August and
September of 1918, when they
were privately told by General
Ludendorff that defeat was immi-
nent, Germany's cleverest, most
ruthless men, the German General
Staff, the top-ranking industrial-
ists, and some of the most astute
university professors, came to-
gether with a strong common pur-
pose: to form a cabal powerful
and fanatic enough to make ready
a new army and to sweep Ger-
many to victory after a short
armistice.
# * #
ALL around Ludendorff in that
tense autumn of 1918, how-
ever, there was indescribable na-
tional confusion. The various
cliques seethed in a ferment; the
cabinet members despairing of
favorable armistice terms if the
Kaiser did not withdraw; the old-
time, feudally trained men among
the army officers supporting the
Kaiser's defiance: and the Kaiser
himself swaying from one bewil-
derment to another as the popular
discontent became too apparent to
enough, but with murder in their
hearts.
Many as the differences must
be, in circumstances and in back-
ground. the one great similarity
remains the same: the reason for
making the change—to despoil the
,'ictors of the fruits of victory.
be ignored. For the people had j When finally, in the dense
learned that it was the Kaiser's [morning fog of Nov. 10, the Kaiser
refusal to abdicate that was keep- i 'led, Prince Max von Baden, bacic
ing the longed-for peace dangling I in Ber'in, hurriedly thrust tne
just out of their reach. j leadership of the state into me
During all these hazardous days
the industrialists, who had always
actively but discreetly directed
the government, kept themselves
far in the background. But they
were busy. All the men whom
Ludendorff had tipped off as to
a possible German defeat used
what private pressure they could
to bring about the abdication.
hands of the Social Democrat,
Friedrich Ebert. With tears in
rp'HE differences between the
closing days of World War I
and World War II are bound to
be many. One of the fundamental
dissimilarities lies in the persons
of the heads of state. As king
and emperor, the Kaiser auto-
matically commanded the absolute
loyalty of his officers, just as his
forebears had commanded the
loyalty of their ancestors. But, in
the eyes of the master-powers of
Germany, who has Ilitier ever
been? Just a rather vulgar little
man who was useful, whose dar-
ing, whose visionary qualities and
extraordinary insight emboldened
him to take steps which the more
respectable if equally ruthless
military commanders feared to
take. Further, being a commoner,
he could reach the' mind of the
masses. Separating from the
Kaiser was a hard wrench, like
parting from a close family mem-
ber—getting rid of Hitler, only a
pleasure to many of the key men
who have followed him obedienilv
his eyes, Prince Max begged him
' to "do whatever you can for the
German Reich."
To this Ebert replied, "I have
already given it two sons."
Both Ludendorff and his friends
hoped that the 14-point program
of President Wilson would soften
the terms imposed on Germany.
But they took no chances. Every-
thing within reach that could be
of use in future war, was effec-
tively hidden: blueprints for new
arms, models, materials, and
molds suddenly vanished. Luden-
dorff himself supervised the re-
moval of part of the general staff
files from the redbrick staff build-
ing near the Victory Column. He
also won the heart of his indus-
trial friends by ordering the re-
moval of most of the .documents
of the Kriegsamt, the War Office
branch responsible for tile manu-
facture of German war equip-
ment. These files contained proof
of the profiteering which had
made the rich industrialists richer.
I Once the Kaiser had lied, Lu-
dendorff fell he could move more
freely, for the high officers" on
whom so much of his plan de-
1 pended were no longer divided
{ between their obedience to him
' and their allegiance to their king
or emperor. •
(To Be Coiumucu;
More Clothing
Needed For War
Torn Countries
Sweetwater Pastors' Associa-
tion and Women's Alliance co-
operating with all Sweetwater
churches urge the public to do-
nate clothing needed by United
Nations in caring for liberated
people this winter.
Mrs. Sidney Woodman, Wo-
men's Alliance chairman, is
pointing out that any type of
clothing is acceptable including
women's men's infant garments
and clothes for the teen-age
group. Everything with the ex-
ception of shoes and hats. Win-
ter or summer garments ara
needed. Collection is being as-
sembled in the rear of the wel-
fare building, 401 Oak street.
Three Thompson
Sons In Service
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Thompson,
Sr., 711 Bowie street, have re-
ceived word from their three
sons in the armed forces.
Cpl. W. H. Thompson, Jr., who
recently returned from 2~>
months service in the South and
southwest Pacific with a cavalry
troop, is under treatment in the
t'ort Sam Houston station hos-
pital. He is ill of malaria.
I'll Alvin Dicli Thompson Is
now stationed at Boca Raton,
Fla.: where he is serving in tha
army -to force and studying ra
dar.
Pfc. Mel via Thompson, forme'
county commissioner, is in Italy.
He is attached to the ground
force of the army air corps.
—I v
Illegal Advertising
General Lear Warns
Against Waste
i WASHINGTON — (UP) —
j The White House has announc-
I ed that President Roosevelt and
j Prime Minister Winston Church-
ill conferred V-t week at Hyde
I Park, where they completed
! plans to give the Italian people
| a greater hand in ruling their
| country.
The United States and Britisn
i leaders continued their Quebec
I discussions at the President's
j Hudson river estate last Monday
I and Tuesday.
Churchill and Mr. Roosevelt
! will invite the present Italian
| government to appoint "direct
representatives" to Washington
: and London. The White House
1 rdded that the . Allied control
commission for Italy will be rc-
| named "The Allied Commission"
' and will promote a plan to give
an increasing measure of control
i to the Italian administration.
308 Genuine Rubber
Tires Go On Sale
DETROIT -—(UP) — The cits*
| of Detroit is having a sale—and
they'll probably have to call in
| the police force and fire trucks
as well to keep the customers in
line.
$22.50 per
I piece of
rationing
— 308 pro-
rubber.
ntered cs second class matter a
In Sweetwater. Texas, Feb. 9,
Rita Weaver, City Editor
' ' '
"There is only one evil", wrote
Socrates, "that is ignorance." And ignorance it
obviously is, which sometimes prompts the care-
less car-owner to say that all motor ods are alike,
that there is no difference between any of them.
Oils vary in chemical composition, in stability,
in freedom from harmful impurities, in lasting
power, in ability to maintain viscosity, and in many
other ways as well.
That is why all intelligent car-owners naturally
prefer a quality oil. But not all of them know the
simple, easy way to- be sure of getting it, as ex-
plained by the following facts:
Phillips offers a number of oils because car-
owners' preferences vary almost as much as their
cars and pocketbooks. But when you want our
best oil, remember Phillips tells you frankly that
Phillips 66 Motor Oil is our finest quality . . . the
highest grade and greatest value .. . among all the
oils we offer to average motorists.
_ _ Figure the cost per year of draining and re-
filling with quality oil every two months, as experts
advise, as against the cost of using cheap oil; and it is
plainly foolish economy to take a chance. So when
making the seasonal change from summer-worn lubri-
cant, get quality by getting Phillips 66 Mocor Oil.
Care For Your Cir - Pur Your Country
PROVED IN
OF SERVICE
v' r's * . - -v
- A'-*
. * . '.V.W 1 WWW? w WW W .' ' "
^ W,n , X -I .. ...MU I M,^. ^ .
It's at a set price
item — plus a smal
paper signed by the
board.
The merchandise?
war tires of genuine
holds
| \v tro MKi-rn \<j
DALLAS — (t'J'i — The Tex-
as Grange announces that it is
-sponsoring a meeting in Waco
tomorrow of interest to mem-
i ■ rs i>f the cotton industry in
j i exits.
I Tie. president of th" National
.'Cotton Council • Oscar Johnson
<il Scott. Mississippi will out
; line items that should be in-
| eluded in a well-rounded cotton
I program at he meeting.
< • l-"i \ Ol K l oot ball Season
Tickets liefore I'l'iilay from
an.\ .layree member or al
(ioodyear Service Store.
OUT OUR WAY
Our Guarding House With Major
THEBE MAY BE. TRAMPS, '
SO YOU STAY KSEAR MF,
BUT LOOK ALL TH' <
CATTLE CACS—THEY'RE
60IM' WEST AM' HE
THINKS HE IS' His
COWBOY HAT AM'
THINGS ABE MISSING
Y/HEVJW-H.' LOOK \
IK) ALL OF THEM? I
IF HE CAM STAMD J
IT THAT FAR IN S
OKIE O'THEM, J
I'D LET HIM /"T <r:
I
-1 ""c,.
iIRmuftMs
•fir
OPN THIPTY yfap-. too
OOM
WELL, MO\M THMr
WOO'ME FOOMD
*Ti-te bankroll
\MHY OOKn Soo
l|\MEST IK} SOME
TMlMG S(OU CM^'T
LOSS, LIK.S
HOivMM><3 ^
WE SA0E6RUS
A PLAY SO IT ? ARE- .
VOL) PLftr-iKMMG
TO POT YOUR.
BC2AN<i ONi A
COUPLiT OF
HAMBURGERS
EG AO.' YOUE.
Humor, commulses
ME/-—YOO
MOKELS SHO'JLD
KNCMTHAT IN MV
COVOPuMCHlMG
DAYS X COULD
ROPE A FIELD
M.OUSE
K
FILLED
OP TI4E
vJioe
OPEN}
SPACES
1944 M* M * MRVlcr <NC r M HC
Mrs. P. L. Ulloin
New President 0!
Septist Society
Members of the Baptist Mi
sionary Union met at the church j
Monday afternoon for a combin-
ed missionary and business,
meeting.
The Blanch Rose Walker circle
was in charge of the program.
After the missionary lesson,
Mrs. Clifton Lambert, president,
presided during the business
meeting and election of new of-
ficers. Mrs. R. C. Crane read the
installation service.
New officers for the coming
year are Mrs. P. L. Ullom, presi-
dent. Mrs. Homer Baxter, secre
tary,treasurer, vice - presidents,
which are the ehairmans of
every circle, Mrs. Grady Odom,
Mrs. J. C. Craig, Mrs. C. E. Cor-
bin. Mrs. Sam Jones, and Mrs.
A. L. Putman. Committee chair-
mans are Mrs. R. H. Taylor, Mrs.
R. C. Crane, Mrs. C. B. Lambert. I
Mrs. P. K. Ponder, Mrs. H. Blan-1
cett, Mrs. Bob 6reining, Mrs. E. ]
(. Steakley, and Mrs. J.
Harvey.
Germany, Japan and
Italy Formed Axis
Four Years Aoo
Hy United Press
This day used to be an import-
ant one for Germany, Japan and
Italy.
On September 27th, 1910 thev
signed their famous three power
pact amid a fanfare of propa-
ganda and pomp.
Today — four years later —
the anniversary is being observ-
ed in comparative obscurity.
There is nothing for the Axis to
eolehratc. what with Germany
uceessfully invaded, the ofl'er-
.■ ive against Japan mounting,
lid Iiberalcd Ilaly flee of the
fascist taint
Today Germany's Foreign Min-
ister Itibbentrop makes a speech
in connection with the signing of
flu pact. Mussolini, dangling
from Hitler's string more than
ever before, also is scheduled to
speak. There's no indication of
what, they'll say. There has been
no Nazi propaganda build-up for
the occasion, other than the
bare announcements that both
men will deliver anniversary
speeches.
Anti-Roosevelt
Electors Given 10
Days To Take Pledqe
BATON ROI'GE. La.' (I P) — |
The attempted anti-Roosevelt re-
Volt of Louisiana's 10 presiden- j
tial electors appears about end- j
ed.
The Democratic state central
committee has given the elect-
ors 10 days in which to pledge
their votes to national party
nominees or resign. The com-
mittee will meet again on Oct-
ober 7th to select now electors
to replace any one who refuse to
pledge their votes to President
Roosvelt and Sneator Harry
Truman.
Betty Heard had as her guests
for the weekend, Patsy Rozor of
Colorado City, and her mother,
Mrs. J. P. Spurlin, of Midland.
* ♦ *
Mrs .1. H. Westbrook has re-
turned from Lubbock where she
spent two weeks visiting her
daughter, Mrs, 11. J. Bort.
Wreck Killing 26
Ruled Accidental
TERRE HAUTE, lnd. (UP) —
The death of 20 servicemen m
the wreck of the Dixie Flyer
passenger train at Terre Hauto
early this month has been de-
clared accidental in a coroner's
verdict.
Coroner I) M. Ferguson also
has returned a verdict of acci-
dental death for the train porter.
But he has returned no verdict
in the deaths of two crewmen—
Frank Blair of Farmersburg,
lnd., and Louis Rausch of Evans-
ville, lnd.
An inquest statement by . a
conductor on the Florida-bound
flyer said the train was ordered
to pass a north-bound mail train
at a siding north of Terre Haute.
He did not know why the Flyer
was not stopped. Ferguson say-;
only the engineer and fireman of
the Flyer, both injured fatally, in
the wreck, could explain the fail-
ure to stop.
Forrestal Will Visit
Oklahoma Novy Day
j OKLAHOMA C1T V— (UP) —
j Governor Kerr savs Secretary of
; Navy lames P. Forrestal will vis-
! it Oklahoma on October 27th —
' Navy Day.
I The governor and the Okla-
I h.nma City Chamber of Com-
| meree issued the invitation,
| which the navy secretary has ac-
cepted — contingent upon good
I fly:ng weather so he can mak"
j the trip by plane.
v
Auxiliary Meets
To Plan Dinner
Air line Chairman
Soon To Be Released
From U. S. Army
WASHINGTON — (UP) —
Brigadier General Thomas B.
Wilson, chairman of the board
of Transcontinental & Western
Air Lines, will soon be released
by the army and placed on inac-
tive status so ne can resume his
duties wit lithe air company.
The president of TWA, Jack
Frye, says that General Wilson
— a native of \\ dliamstown,
Kansas — has recently returned
from New I)<*!ii where he car-
ried out his second major wai •
time assignment in the Asiatic
theater of war. He was chief of
transportation of the China-Bur-
ma-India theater under General
Joseph W, Stihvell,
BBC Denies Miller
Music Banned
NEW YORK — (UPI — Th >
| British Broadcasting Corpora-
1 tion denies a statement in the
j newspaper Daily Sketch that it
i ia dbanned the music by the Al-
! ied Supreme headquarters or-
i ehestra conducted by Major
| Glenn Miller, the paper had said
I the ban was evoked because Mil-
! ler's music was not. acceptable
! to the British public.
sc."
wor
Girl Scout Troop ^
Plans For Year
Plans for the year's activity
of the Forget-Me-Not Girl Scot
troop, led by Mrs. Jack C^inin
ham, were made when the troi
held a get-together at Mrs. Cu 1
ningham's home, 501 West Brw;
Friday afternoon. j
The girls will finish '
ond class badges, set up
shop for their arts an
study the life of Juliette
and hold a social meeting one
each month during the _ yea;
Meetings will be on Mjoclne
(.lays instead of Tuesda™, ai;
will begin at 5 o'clock at u
home of the leader until furtht
! notice.
Refreshments were serve
j Friday afternoon to the folk"
' ing: Lola Jean Harris, RiWy Lc ,
i Wilson, Nina Ruth Parker, Le IS.
| tha Jean Hunt, Bobby Lt
Jackson, Katherine Cavitt, Bi
; die June McCain, and a ne
• member, Mareene Ellis.
p a Wwi -j
nd craft |J
«e Low™
m
CONGRATULATIONS^
Mr and Mrs. Hudson Linco
are parents of a daughter, Jud'
Kay, born at 10:53 a. m_ TueJ<
(lav at the Sweetwater fifispit:
Mi*. Lincoln is a wholesale me
salesman.
1
1
4
I
The American Legion Auxili-
ar.\ will have an till flay meeting
at the Legion home Thursday.
Sept, 2s. Women will meet at
<>::?(; a. ni.. and spend the day at.
the hut making preparations for
i he I .ejdon banquet Oct i.
A covered dish luncheon will
be served at noon,
r*l/tSU IRRITATIONS OF
ol\lw external caust
Acne pimples, eczema, factory derma-
titis, simpleriiiRwnnn, tetter, saltrhuum,
bumps, tblaeklicads), and ugly broken-
nut skin. Millions relieve itching, burn-
ing and soreness of these miseries witli
pimple home treatment.. Goes to work at
once. Aids healing, works the antiseptic
uay. b.sc black and White Ointment only
a.< directed. 10c, 2'ic, 50c Hizes. 25 years'
success. Money-back guarantee. Vital
in cleansing is good soap. I'.njoy fa-
mous black and White Hkm Soap daily.
Dial 3101
Tread-Weld Modem Methr^s
1SCSPPING
$175 , !
On oOO x 16
PHIL'S 0. K. RUBBER WELDERS '
Sweetwater, ^ex.
WHEN HEALTH IS A QUESTION
COMPAKK—n.-.il'AKISON I'ltot t-'S. Vor niorr
tliini thirty-one yeni's Dr. (aiilil's im'.ALIfll
VICH lias been restoiijlig those in ill health. I lie
iji'JST Miiiera! Water, linesl equipment anil eoint-
(coils etlieient treatineiil nl'len means the difference
between success and l'ailure to those in search oJL
hhai-TH. •
Sweetwater Mineral Wells Sanatorium
IXAI, 2(il2
VISIT SUNBEAM'S
MC8ERN SANITARY
SLAUGHTER PLANT
We <hi custom slauKlilcrliig
Livestock Received
Ever- Week Day
Troiii 8 ii. in. lo (1 p. m.
Killing Days
Tuesdays . . . Wednesdays
and Fridays
SUNBEAM
SLAUGHTER PLANT
West of Rivpphvnter
On ltnnl<liea<1 Highway
Bring Us Your
LIVESTOCK
AUCTION EVERY WEDNESDAY, 1 P. M.
Save i'rcijjht, shrinkage and bruises, by selling your stock
through our auctions, and ite assured ol' top market priee^Ev-
cry modern facility lo meet the needs of buyers and sellers.
SWEETWATER LIVESTOCK AUCTION
MILKS CULWELIj-
West Itroudwny
-SAM A I'LT
Plione20M

Mark S. Nichols
Phone 3-111
llox 8:17, hu'eetwater, Texas
Tin; Reserve Ijoan Ijife Man
I,el me tell yon more about tht
"3-KOAD I'liAN"
VOI U LAST bills
WIIIOW'S FlltST bills.
will be your
*«* '-W.

. Sweetwater Reporter (Sweetwater, Tex.), Vol. 47, No. 222, Ed. 1 Wednesday, September 27, 1944. Sweetwater, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth282988/. Accessed July 30, 2014.