Sweetwater Reporter (Sweetwater, Tex.), Vol. 40, No. 325, Ed. 1 Monday, April 18, 1938

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SWEETWATER REPORTER, SWEETWATER, TEXAS
• Lumber Retailers
Place Stress on
•This Department
New Shades of Paint
I Heing Developed
By Manufacturers
Paint is a big feature in home
building and maintenance, de-
clares Bryan Buck, manager (if
the Ferguson Lumber com-
pany. Therefore much atten-
tion is given to this department
at Ferguson's featuring Pitts-
* burgh Paints. This is the paint-
ing season, when weather con-
ditions are more suited to I
painting than at any other sea-
p son, providing the sand is not
blowing.
A new c o I o r has been
brought out by Pittsburgh this
year. It is the new Delphinium
^ Blue. This is a light shade of
blue, an addition to the "Water
Spar" line, extremely popular
for decorations.
Suited to ('Innate
The Pittsburgh firm is a de-
# veloper of paints, and has made
rapid strides in the industry.
Thirty laboratory technicians
stationed in various parts of
the United States, study weath-
er conditions and develop paints
• best suited to climatic condi-
tions In the various sections of
the country. White and shades
of white are favored colors in
this area.
0 Among important department
of the Ferguson company is the
picture framing division, of
which Karl Harris, assistant
manager of the firm, is in direct
charge. A new and large supply
f of modern and modernistic
moldings has been added
to ihe stock in this divi-
sion. The firm specializes in
selecting a frame to suit a pic-
ture, and placing it therein cor-
# red ly.
Wallpaper Department
Decorative features are boun-
tiful at Fergusons. In addition
to interior and exterior paints,
_ a large wallpaper department is
™ maintained. Here is available
papers in a wide range, from in-
expensive to the special orders
of high quality, washable cre-
ations that are more or less pcr-
. mauent in the home.
Memorial To Wright Brothers
Was Opened To Public Saturday
ious Home
pacious
; .. . %:••••• •>'*• - *-■■■-
v>, ^
!EMEI
- i
) The Reporter is authorized to
announce the following candi-
dates for office, subject to ac-
tion of the Democratic prl
mary, July 23, 1938:
For Representative:
> MARSHALL II. PIOU
H. TEMPLE DICKSON'
For District Attorney:
ZOELIE C. STRAKLEY
GEORGE W. OUTLAW
TIUJETT BARBER
^ For District Clerk:
MYRTLE ROBERTSON
For County Attorney:
E. L. DUNCAN
l>'or Sheriff:
TOM WADE
' JESS LAMBERT
JACK YARBROUGII
D H. AI.SCP
For County Treasurer
MRS. G. W. COCHRAN
I MRS. S. N. r.EACTT
' MUS. A. J. PARKER
County .Indue
CI I AS. W. LEWIS
For County Clerk:
E. K. WILLIS
> MARSHALL MORGAN
L. W. (Dock) SCOTT
For Tax Assessor-Collector:
JOHN HALL
RAYMOND BISHOP
For Nupt. of Schools:
> J(M WEATHERBY
ED. F. NEINAST
R. W. (BOB) BOYD
MRS. S. II. STAN FIELD
For Com missioned
Precinct 1:
1 MELVEN THOMPSON
CHAS. U. COLE
C. W. (Charley) HOPKINS
CHARLIE HAGGERTON
J. C. (Jake) GRAY
, PAT MAYES
J. M. (Jim) BRATCHER
LEWIS KERBY
EARL DUVALL
ROBERT L. WASH
II. P. HARKINS
W. T. (Walter) TRAM MELT j
Precinct 2:
R. L. WITT
LEROY JOHNSON
R. L. SHAFFER
TOM H. MAYFIELD, JR.
W. R. (Buck) JOHNSON
Precinct 3:
J. R. (JIM) PAYNE
O. S. MOORE
Prrrlnct 4:
J. M. (JAP) CRAIG
For Constable:
Precinct I:
N. D. REEVES
For Justice of the Peace*
Precinct 1: \
8. H. SHOOK
By WILLIS THORNTON
DETROIT — A simple, home-
made drafting table contrived
from a couple of sawhorses. A
crude gas engine driving a
shaft to which are hooked a
drill, handsaw, lathe, and
emery wheel. A simple, brick-
lined welding and soldering
furnace.
With these elemental tools,
which many a modern mechan-
ic would scrtrn as inadequate to
build a better mousetrap, was
made the first airplane to lift
itself from the ground and fly
under its own power.
They are all together here
now, housed in their original
buildings, the whole having
been moved bodily to Henry
Ford's Greenfield village at
Dearborn. The Dayton, O.,
bicycle shop and the little
white house in which Wilbur
and Orville Wright lived, stood
together to honor Orvil-
le in person and memoralized
his dead brother, Wilbur Sat-
urday. It was the Tlst an-
niversary of Wilbur Wright's
birth. He died in lillii.
Object Lesson
To recreate the Wright work-
shop as an object lesson to
every man of what can he done
with crude facilities, provided
that grit and brains are added,
Ford has been working since
a year ago last October. Orville
Wright has actively aided in
obtaining the authentic equip-
ment and furnishings which re-
main. and in attesting from
memory the correctness of
what had to be duplicated.
For example, the wind-tunnel
with the aid of which the
Wrights made their early cal-
culations. had to be built anew.
Rut it has been done exactly
in accordance with Orville
Wright's vivid memory of the
original one.
It is simply a coffin-like ob-
long box standing waist-high on
four legs, a little more than six
feet long, with a tin funnel
at one end, and a glassed top at
the other, through whichv the
behavior of the structure could
be watched. The Wrights simp-
ly backed it up to the machine
line, and attached a fan on the
the axle of the emery-wheel.
Restoration 1
.Much of the furniture in the
re-located Wright house is jitsi
as it was in Dayton. Fortunate-
ly for this project. Orville
Wright has lived there ever
since the days when he and his
brother were "those lazy fel-
lows down at the bicycle shop
who say there are going to
fly." Most of his old furniture
and equipment remained either
in his hands or in those of a
woman who had been their
housekeeper and to whom they
gave much of their furniture.
Thus acquiring it was simpler
than in many such cases of re-
construction.
The Ford men even found
the complete equipment of a
print shop, type cases and
makeup stone. which the
fill
BED e
• THIN I -ItH . tJOOM
L 'NC BOM
The Wright buildings in (•rceufiehl. Left, Ihe building used as a dark room when the Wrights
were experimenting with photography. Next the Wright home, and. ;il right, the bicycle shop.
wmmzmz
wiMint \VKK;H i
Low Cost Homes
Most in Demand
Houses ranging in price frpfai
S5.000 downward form the ma-
jor per cent of the home-owner-
ship demand in the country to-
day. according to Howard Le-
land Smith, chief. Architectural
Section of the Federal Housing
Administration.
This observation is based up-
on data obtained while conduct-
ing small-home-planning confer-
ence in 54 cities in 47 states.
Average attendance at each
meeting has been in excess of
2()'i persons. These include ar-
chitect builders, developers,
material men, financiers, would-
be home owners, city officials,
and other organized groups in-
terested in promoting home
ownership.
During the month of April
small-In une-planning conferen-
ces will be held at Nashville,
Tenn.: Now Orleans, La.: and
Memphi-. Tenn. The meetings
extend over a period of 1. week.
This home h;is -i\ rooms ,nid liatli anil i- two ;md one-half
stories. An iinusiinlly large li\ing room with large lireplace
iv .-I feature. The property wa appraised by the Federal
Housing administration at S<i,."i<lll and financed by an insured
mortgage of S.">.2(ltl maturing in 'io year-. Monthly payment^
are s:it.::-J.
College Education Should Fit
Men For World. Not World For Men
tv-\N ANTONIO — il'I'i — between two kinds of <>\
The purpose of a college educa-. ment-~dictalor-hip and d>
tion. Dr. Rufus ('. Harris, pre-, cracy". lie said.
sident of Til lane I'niversity. ; trouble with democracy j;
-aid is to "fit men for the' « "«er an,i h,rk (li<r
Irino-
great
dis-
pline
irKi:
U) fit ihe? world i• >r
among its citizens.
■ The
)f college.
aivi
Floors Are Guide
To Room Appearance
No matter how well furnish-
ed a room might be. if the floors
are shabby, its entire appear-
mi e will be spoiled. Floors
that have splintered or rough
place- arc dangerous when
there are -mall children in the
family.
I'nder the modernization cre-
dit plan of the Federal Housing
idministration new floors may
be laid. If thi- i- not desirable
i ' 'imposition covering that is
ri'tneiued or otherwise perman-
ency laid may 1m- installed.
Hitter creek Plans
Community Event
Orville Wright, left, and Henry Ford on the porch of Ihe
old Wright home.
Wright boys had operated in
Dayton when they were very
young and before the bicycle-
shop days. That equipment has
been installed in the restored
bicycle shop, though it was not
originally in that building.
Historic Planes
The third airplane motor the
Wright hoys ever built has
been obtained for display: but
the original Wright plane that
changed the world's history at
Kitty Hawk is of course in an
English museum. and Henry
Ford was no more successful
than any other American thus
far in attempting to get it
back.
There are other historic
planes nearby in the museum of
: the Ford Edison institute, how-;
lexer, including an early Hleriot.j
sister ship of the first plane to I
! flv the English Channell: Ad-
miral llyrd's "Josephine Ford."!
J in which he flew over the North)
Pole: the "Flo.vd Henneti." South !
1 I'ole conqueror: and "The Pride
i of I tot roil" in which I iroek i
and Schlee flew around the
world in ini!7.
Also .in display are tne Ger-j
j man Junkers which made the I
| first ea.-t-west crossing of the!
Atlantic, and the first connner-1
I dal autogiro.
To Open Shop and Home
The Early Birds, an organiza-|
tion of men and women who
had flown before Dec. 17. 1!M6.
\ the Kith anniversarv of the
Battle Cry In Washington Seems To Be
LET'S HAVE INVESTIGATION
lly NKA Service
WASHINGTON — If you
aren't in on an investigation,
either as investigator, counsel,
committee member, witness, tip-
ster. spectator, reporter, or just
a fan, you don't cut much ice
in Washington these days.
As a committee began
probing into the operation of
TVA, congressman had under
way its seventh major investi-
gation. No matter when the ses-
sion officially adjourns, this as-
sures a continuous run of con-
gressional news well into the
summer.
The "main tent" of the Wash-
ington show is the House and
Senate. Hut the numerous "side
shows" held in the committee
rooms are growing more impor-
tant and more spectacular every
year. They run all the way from
major exhibitions like the epoch-
al Pecora investigation of bank-
ing and stock market practice
down to the smallest hearing in-
quiring into the merits of a pro-
tective tariff on shoelaces.
Special Interest
Professional investigators, in-
dignant partisans, reluctant wit-
nesses. pass in review before
the investigating committees.
And from their often contradic-
tory testimony, the committee-
men must distill the facts on
which to base legislation.
The TVA investigation will
probably top them all in inter-
est, first because of the ad
vance publicity it hau had; sec-
ond. because of its interesting
personalities both in the New
Deal and among its enemies; and
third, because for the first time
modern investigation techni-
que may be turned loose on a
New Deal agency. Hut it will be
just one more investigation for
Washingtonians.
The Senate committee to in-
vestigate lobbying, headed by
Hugo L. Black before his eleva-
tion to the Supreme Court, but
whose mainspring recently has
been Senate Sherman Minton
of Indiana, has had the spotlight
recently. Refusal of the Nation-
al Committee to I phold Consti-
tutional Government to submit |
its * record made a test of
the powers of such investigating
committees.
Civil Liberties
The Education and Labor Com-
mittee's intermittent sessions
probing into violation of civil
liberties have had the aggres-
sive backing of Senator LaFol-
lette of Wisconsin. Their most
recent revelations have thrown
light on the organization of
"citizen<' committees" during
the "Little Steel' strike of last
summer, with alleged denial of
legttI rights to strikers.
Chairman Hurton K. Wheeler
of the Senate Interstate Com-
merce Committee has been dog-
gedly unwinding the intricacies
of railroad financing, getting to-
gether data necessary to a so-
lution of the railroad mess,
Which finds 30 per cent of the
country's railroads in receiver- j
sh i p.
Unemployment and relief are j
among our major problems, and
here you find another commit- j
tee at work, headed by Senator
James F. Byrnes. His most con- j
spicuous witness was Bernard
M. Baruch, once pointed out!
as "Ihe master mind behind the;
New Deal." but who surprising-
ly lambasted the daylights out \
of it, blaming its policies for j
the present business recession. I
Wool and Water
Senator Copeland of New I
York has been prominent in I
the Senate committee probe of j
the American merchant marine,
seeking to evolve a workable j
plan that will put the I'nited |
States back on the high seas.
Another committee is probing!
into the wool business.
But these are only the major
investigations. Hearings on pro- j
posed bills are constantly going
on. Tax revision brought plenty
of acrid commVnt before the I
Senate Finance Committee, and
a proposal to widen the scope |
of a National Labor Relations!
Act has brought the whole work J
ing of that vital law under ex-1
animation by a subcommittee:
of the Senate Education and j
Labor Committee.
Pending bills to regulate civil
ian flying, on compulsory li
censing of patents, on creating
additional judgeships, on re-
stricting the length of railroad
trains, and the like, all bring
Kitty Hawk triumph, has cen-
tered it- activities on the
building tip of the Edison In-
stitute aeronautic museum. The
member- are helping to build
up ' exhibits, and were active
in bringing the Wright bicycle
i and hoine to I )>-t i'"it.
Many of them were guests '
wiili Henry Ford and Orville
Wright when the buildings were :
dedicated Saturday. Gen. Benja-
min Foiiloi-. the first army
liver: W. E. Scripps. Detroit:
newspaper proprietor: Fred
Hoover, and other Early Birds;
who flew the first _ "box-kites",
were there, with Eddie Rick-
enbaeker and the Wrights' old
Dayton neighbor. Charles F.
Kettering, himself a famous in-
dustrial scientist and an in-
ventor of distinction. More than
L'oo people actively identified
with aviation were invited.
Following the dedication cere-
monies Saturday. The Wright
shop and home exhibit were
opened to Greenfield visitors in
ihe same manner as the simi-
lar memorial to Thomas A. Edi-
son close by. Henry Ford be-
lieves these should be a con-
tinual inspiration to young
visitors as examples of what
can be done, even without ela-
borate equipment, by men with
brains and the determination to
. use them.
ail eager partisans ready to
pour a Niagara of words on the
appropriate congressional com-
mittee.
Congressmen come to Wash-
ington to legislate. They remain
to investigate.
mt'n- : versities i- to prepare the
Dr. Harris and other members: p|() ,u issues without
ot the Tulane faculty visited al. ethical or emotional u;
San Antonio enroute to New In other words, to help
Orleans from Dallas where they conduct their affair- ration
attended a meeting of the
Southern Association of Col-
leges and I niversities.
A problem in university
training today. Dr. Harris said.
is to strive for quality in edu-
cation through limiting enroll-
ment .
"Todav w
peo-
nu ir-
>se t s.
them
:111 V."
BITTERCREEK
\ candida-
te- i-iiJi* and program is being
planned for the community,
Friday evening. May 20. The
public is invited.
a vc
a con
( om m ission Steps
In In Power Fuss
THAYER. Mo. — Thayer re-
sidents put away their candles ;
and kerosene lamps last night
after the Missouri Public Ser-
vice commission ordered electri-
cal service restored by the Ark-
ansas-.Missouri Power company.;
The city had been w ithout i
electricity since early Thursday
when the power company dis- ■
continued service abruptly as
the climax to a legal battle over .
the construction of a municipal I
power plant.
The commission, acting on its \
own motion, directed the power i
company to turn on electricity i
in the city until further notice. ;
Commissioner John A. Eergu-1
son said the company operated j
on a certificate of convenience
and necessity issued by the!
state and was liable to a fine |
of 81.000 each day it failed to;
comply with the order.
( 11 A R MIN G—( () \11' A < "I — CON V FN IENT
A beautiful little home for the exacting owner.
Built with inlets for all modern developments in-
cluding Automatic Heating—Air Conditioning —
Increased Electrification. Complete insulation—
New Materials in Building and Decorating. Call us
today.
Easy to Build under F.H.A.
BURTON LINGO COMftNY
Tionetrjftimlennm High
PHQN t W
12-Year-Old Girl
Is Youngest Co-Ed
WAX A H ACH I E . t'pi -
Sue Allyn Stripling. 12. of No-
eona. a student at Trinity I'ni-
versity here, is believed to be
the youngest co-ed in an Ameri-
can college.
MiA Stripling, now complet-
ing her freshman year, is a can-
diat.e for an award annually giv-
en the freshman making the
highest average for the year, but
that item covers only one facet
of her personality.
She was offered scholarships
by schools in all parts of the
nation, but she chose Trinity be-
cause its curricula in drama,
romance languages and biology
appealed to her.
Entering last fall with her
youth as a handicap. Miss Strip-
ling easily "made" the Players
Club, a dramatic organization,
her first trvout. Her recreations
include ventriloquism, golfing,
horseback riding ami tennis.
Jler choice in boys in the
Her choice in boys is the
"smart" football player type.
Miss Stripling weighs 110 lbs.,
and is 5 feel, :i inches tall
Instead of being ridiculed be-
cause of her age. she has gain-
ed the admiration of all her fel-
low students, instructors and of-
ficials of the university because
of her vivacity and poise.
Forrest Koen
Ben Koen
Builders
Every time voti are
handing a receipt for
rent—did you ever hap-
pen to think that it
could he a bank deposit
slip.
You can buy a home un-
der the new F.H.A. plan
that is very similar to
paying rent. Let us ex-
plain to you how you.
too, can own your own
home.
Consult With
Us About
Your Plans
The Modern Kitehen
Your Assurance of Dependability
Bv I'se of
Standard
!M.r\1BING FIXTI RES
Dependable Plumbing Fixtures
WESTERN
WINDMILL
COMPANY
111 WEST 1ST ST.

. Sweetwater Reporter (Sweetwater, Tex.), Vol. 40, No. 325, Ed. 1 Monday, April 18, 1938. Sweetwater, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth290339/. Accessed December 20, 2014.