Sweetwater Reporter (Sweetwater, Tex.), Vol. 40, No. 325, Ed. 1 Monday, April 18, 1938

PAGE FOUll
justice and judgment it more acceptable
Lord thorn aocrifice.-—Proverba 21 ;3
-/jl^
SWEETWATER, TEXAS
Benftttt
MONDAY, APRIL 18, 1938
'Hya, Butch!'Hya, Spike!'
U to give to every man his own.—
JjETWATER IS \
GORGING AHEAD ••••
You have only to look about you and discover ample
* evidence to the effect that Sweetwater is entering an
;£>it era 0f unprecedented growth.
This growth is not the result of any particular
booming influence such as oil, the location of a new
industry, or some such similar activity that often
provides the impetus of a community's expan-
sion, but, on the other hand this growth ife
because of the inherent good qualities that have
been builded into the community since its in-
ception.
Sweetwater is the logical location for a substantial
city and it is the greater realization of this fact that
is sending it on to its destined place in the sun.
Living conditions in Sweetwater are about as
near perfect as you will find, though you search
this country over. Its altitude of some 2100 feet
is considered ideal; its normal season is not too
dry nor is it too wet. Although its climate pro-
vides four distinct seasons, we do not have the
extremes that are found elsewhere. Its fiercest
"norther" would hai'dly make a dent in a Mon-
tana blizzard for instance.
It is therefore because of these natural advantages
and the fact that it has become through the years,
a home city, a transportation center, a trading center,
a livestock center, an industrial center and an an agricul-
tural center- that Sweetwater is pushing on to its
rightful place as one of the great cities of the Southwest.
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News comes from England of a boy whose head
ticks like a watch. All he needs now is a constant com-
panion with a face that would stop a clock.
# * *
Narcotics were smuggled recently in a shipment of
cricket bats, which was not only a dopey idea but
wasn't cricket.
■ * * *
An expedition of German mountain climbers has
started up one of the peaks in the Himalayas, and
more than one nation in the vicinity is hoping it
doesn't look too attractive from the air.
# * +
Police of-Salt Lake City have been ordered to brush
up on their etiquette. "Beg pardon, but halt, please,
in the name of the law."
♦ ♦ ♦
The license commissioner says Coney Island needs
a new coat of paint. And here we thought that visitors
had been painting the town red for years.
* * #
Lily Pons, the opera star, went through with a ship-
board concert despite a furious Atlantic gale. She was
probably under the impression that it was a storm
of applause.
Legendary Outlaw
3
-
a*
:2t
"U
HORIZONTAL
1,6 Legendary
English
outlaw.
9 Solitary.
10 Striped fabric.
12 Learning.
.'V 13 Kindled.
14 Mother.
"' 15 Land right.
17 Possessed.
19 Girl.
21 Grief.
22 Sudden
_ invasion by
police.
,• 24 Sword guard
plate.
27 Among his
*tt i followers was
JJJ'*. h's chaplain
;,'m . Friar .
31 Frozen water.
32 He was a
skilled —
(pl.).
Sj 34 Monkey,
g > 35 Preposition.
SV, 36 Age.
Si i 37 Stream
•• obstruction.
f39 Postscript.
*40 Smoker's tube.
Answer to Previous Puzzle
SIR WALTER
RALEGH
R I M
TOE,
43 Breaks away.
45 Turkish
commandcr.
46 To dibble.
48 Mineral
spring.
49 Seed bags.
51 Cantaloupe,
53 Heavenly
body.
56 Blackbird.
57 Threatened.
59 Fish.
60 He was also
61 He hid in the
forest of .
VERTICAL
1 Sun god.
2 Jar.
3 To hoot.
4 Foray.
5 Requires.
6 Entrance
room.
7 Kimono sash.
8 Curse.
11 Flightless bird
14 His
sweetheart,
Maid .
16 Starlike.
18 Judicial
decisions.
19 Falsehood.
20 Whetstone.
23 Deeds.
25 South
Carolina.
26 To exist.
28 Plural
pronoun.
29 Sleeveless
cloak.
30 Osculation.
32 Opera melod
33 Membranous
bags.
36 Breakfast fcx
38 Geographical
drawings.
41 Wireless.
42 Paradise.
43 Era.
44 Inner
courtyard.
47 Sound of
sorrow.
49 Wages.
50 Unit.
51 Males.
52 Born.
54 Stir.
55 Scarlet.
57 Mother.
58 Doctor.
Miifi®
[
STORIES IN
STAMPS
SftQONO PM&dcnt
Oh US. Stamp
Movie Scrapbook
By BUI
BUI Porter Caricature* by George 8
Trade Mark Registered V .S. .Patent Office
Scarbo •
Trances MEKCCR, •
TFtTielfkene'ss of George Wash-
ington was altogether fitting to
follow that of Franklin on the
first American postage stamps,
that of Thomas Jefferson was no
less well chosen.
For by 1851, when the first
full series of U. S. postage was is-
sued, history had already placed
Thomas Jefferson in imperish-
able perspective. He had drafted
the Declaration of Independence,
served in the Continental Con-
gress, revised the statutes of Vir-
ginia, served as minister (o
France, secretary of state undei
Washington, was twice elected
President, founded the University
of Virginia, and had negotiated the
Louisiana Purchase.
When he died July 4, 1826, 50th
anniversary of the Declaration oi
Independence, he went secuit
in his stature as Ihc most con-
spicuous of American apostles oi
democracy and one of the great-
est liberals of modern times. Aside
from Washington, he was the only
President on the 1851 series. Tiic
five-cent stamp, brown, show-
ing Jefferson after a painting by
Stuart, is reproduced below, one
and one-half times actual size.
(Copyright, 1D38, NEA Servico, Inc.;
BACKSTAGE IN WASHINGTON
BY RODNEY DITCHER
WASHINGTON — Nomi-
nation of Congressman
Scott Lucas in the Illinois
Democratic senatorial pri-
mary was displeasing to
Jim Farley, encouraging to
advocates of good govern-
ment, disappointing to
militant labor and incon-
clusive as it affected the
political fortunes of Mr.
Roosevelt.
Farley had insisted on
backing the notorious Kel-
ly-Nash Machine of Chicago
in its support of Mike
Igoe, and Assistant Attorney
General Joe Keenan, one of
Farley's generals, went out
to make a speech at an Igoe
dinner. Labor's Non-Parti-
san League also supported
Igoe against Lucas, who
last December voted to
recommit the wage-hour
bill.
No New Dealer
Lucas is no New Dealer
and if he is elected, as seems
likely, he will be more sat-
isfactory to conservatives
than is the incumbent Sen-
ator Dieterich, who could
always be depended on by
the administration. New
Dealers less "practical" than
Mr. Farley, however, are
glad the Kelly-Nash ma-
chine was licked and think
the inference is that Roose-
velt should be victorious
any time he wants openly
to appeal on behalf of a
clean candidate against a
corrupt big city machine.
Roosevelt, himself kept
hands off the Illinois pri-
mary and his relations with
Governor Horner, whose
state machine put Lucas
over, remain friendly and
close.
Further conclusions are
difficult because a horde of
Republicans, with no hot
senatorial battle of their
own, voted in the Demo-
cratic primary — mostly
for Lucas.
Congressmen from other
states are encouraged to
note that all incumbent
congressmen from Illinois
were nominated. There had
been fear that voters, sour-
ed by depression, were like-
ly to hoot an unduly large
number of congressmen now
sitting.
Promotion Due?
The next conspicuous
promotion of a woman und-
er this administration is
likely to be that of Miss
Marion J. Harron, only
female member of the U. S.
Board of Tax Appeals. Miss
Harron is being considered
for one of the two new fed-
eral district judgeships in
California which Congress Is
about to provide.
Regarded as one of the
ablest members of the tax
board, Miss Harron Is a
lawyer who has specialized
in corporation organization
and reorganization, bank-
ing, taxation, anti-trust laws
and other fields of finance.
She practiced law for 10
years in Berkleley, Calif.,
and in New York City and
was appointed to the board
in July, 1930. Now she
travels about the country
sitting as a trial judge on
taxpayer appeals from
Bureau of Internal Reve-
nue assessments.
Facing a crowded calend-
ar in New York recently,
Miss Harron called in all
the lawyers, asked how
much time each would take
and allotted the time so
the lawyers wouldn't have
to hang around waiting un-
necessarily. The calendar
was finished in spectacular-
ly fast time, partly because
hearings ran past the din-
ner hour. Other board mem-
bers, accustomed to fin-
ishing at 4:30, grumbled.
Sugary Legislator
Sweetest congressman
of the year is Charles A.
Plumley of Vermont, who
not only has just sent a
small package of Vermont
maple sugar to each of the
530 members — and to
correspondents as well,
bless his soul!—but ac-
companies the gifts with
the message:
"It stands the undefeated,
undisputed, unchallenged
champion in its class: the
best in the world. More-
over it is 100 per cent pure
( unadulterated, and the gen-
I nine article;—so also is my
regard for you."
-o-
PtflY€P HOCHEY AT FINISHING.
SCHOOL
Studies BALLET DANOMG
I
Dick Merrill Named,
World's Ace Pilot
I'ARIS — (UP)— The Inter-
national League of Aviators,
Saturday announced the selec-
tion of Dick Merrill, American
flier, as the world's champion
aviator for 1937 and Miss Jean
Batten, of New Zealand, as the
champion woman flier.
t'apt. Max Pruss won first
rank as a dirigible pilot for his
service on Germany's lighter-
than-air ships. Ernest Demuyter
of Belgium was chosen the best
spherical pilot.
The selections followed a
world-wide poll of aviators and
balloonists.
——o
Jewish Rabbi
To Be Honored
GALVESTON — (UP) — Dr.
Henry Cohen will be honored by
a celebration on April 27 mark-
ing his 50th anniversary as
rabbi of Temple B'nai Israel and
his 75th birthday.
(President Roosevelt already
has offered his congratulations
and good wishes to the veteran
Jewish leader. Federal Judge
.1. C. Hutcheson of the Fifth
Circuit Court of Appeals at New
Orleans, and Rabbi Johan Wise
of New York will speak at the
forthcoming celebration.
(5s
com. m < «« t vict. mc , « „c. J , PtT 0„
LOOKING
Backwards
FIFTEEN YEARS AGO
Miss Glen Del Trammell (Mrs.
Willis Davis) was crowned
Queen of May in a fete to be
held on the courthouse lawn
in which 100 children took part.
* * *
Rainfall in April was 10.37 in-
ches, setting a record not eq-
ualled since 1885.
* ♦ 4:
More than 500. cars of poultry
were sJiipped from Sweetwater,
most of it consigned to northern
markets.
* * *
TEN YEARS AGO
County Judge A. S. Mauzey
was master of ceremonies for
the health pageant and May
Day celebration. Miss Clovis
Cox (Mrs. Garland Roberts)
was crowned Queen of May.
* * *
Madge Stanford (now deputy
state superintendent) was
awarded first place and $10 in
gold for the best essay on
"Sweetwater Advantages as a
Convention City." Davis Clark
won second place and Jay Fitz-
gerald. third.
* * *
FIVE YEARS AGO
New band commission was
selected at a meeting of the
city commission. They were
J. N. Dulaney, Jim Butler, and
Z. C. Steakley, Jr.
* * *
Commissioners voted to sell
lodge and cabin sites at Lake
Sweetwater for $17 a lease, in-
cluding a $5 fishing and hunt-
ing permit.
By PAUL HARRISON
HOLLYWOOD — All over the
lot: Max Rosenbloom. the fight-
er-actor, crouches at the mas-
sive-looking steel door of a fur
vault and holds an oxy-acetylene
torch against it. But Slapsie's
safe-side manner is not convinc-
ing. In the middle of the scene
he turns and smirks into the
camera with a "How'm I cloin?"
expression. Director Antatole
Litvak cusses and says, "Cut".
The safe-cracking scene, for
"The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse"
must be filmed again. But the
center plate of the vault door
has been marred by the torch,
and it's too hot to repaint. Work-
men are ordered to replace the
plate, and they have a couple
of spares for just such emer-
gencies. First. though, they
must open the door, which is
imposingly studded with dials
and handles.
It doesn't yield to pulling or
pounding. Finally a studio car-
penter notices the tussle. "Hey,
wait a minute", he calls. "I've
got the combination." He goes
over and, with his hammer,
pulls a 10-penny nail that has
been driven into the floor and
against a corner of the door.
It swings open.
Peace, Peace
For one of the Ritz Brothers'
black-out scenes in "Kentucky
Moonshine", Jimmy is a radio
ma.ster-of-ceremonies and in-
troduces A! and Harry as a
couple of distinguished foreign
diplomats who will speak on
peace. The latter are standing
side by side before the micro-
phone and are dressed in top-
pers and tails, false whiskers
and with silk ribbons across
their shirt fronts.
In turn, they make a heavily-
accented harangue about their
respective countries' desire for
peace. They offer assurances of
mutual respect and confidence.
They pat each other on the
DALLAS — (UP) —Supervi-
sor of Utilities Joe Leopold an-
nounced that lighting of a muni-
cipal park had been planned so
no glare would hit the eyes
of lovers parked there. "No ar-
tificial light can sub foi the
moon", Leopold sighed a;s he-
sniffed the spring air.
LEGAL
DIRECTORY
MAYS ft PERKINS
Attorneys-at-Law
322-25 Levy Bldg.
Sweetwater, Texas
'I've spent ten years improving my husband's appear*
once and personality—nitrl now look at him!
BEALL, BEALL, YONGE
ft NEBLETT
Attorneys-at-Law
Doacher Bldf.
SWEETWATER, TEXAS
WO* TftlPTO HOLLYWOOD
IN A SEAUTY CONTEST, ^
back. Then they turn face to
face and as they make a for-
mal bow the camera reveals an
identical jeweled dagger stick-
ing between the shoulder#
blades of each of them.
Ritz Witchery
Another timely act is a bur-
lesque of "Snow White". Harry
Ritz does the scene in which the®
queen turns herself into a
witch. Minces to the magic mir-
ror and intones: "Mirror, mir-
ror, on the wall, who's the
fairest one of all?" ^
The grimacing pan of Al^
Ritz appears in the mirror and
gives the gueen the old up-and-
down. "Not you—you old scare-
crow!" sneers the mirror.
More Smoke Then ... Q
Andrea Leeds again is climb-
ing the stairs of a theatrical
rooming house. But this time
she's running,, and coughing
and choking as she runs. The
coughing is not simulated, for^
the set is billowing with heavy
yellow sulphur smoke. Tho
place is supposed to be on firo
and Miss Leeds is trying to res-
cue her "Letter of Introduction"^
which gives the picture its®
name.
Director John Stahl, choking
too, runs ahead of the actress
and waves a gauze screen to agi-
tate the smoke and so that the^
camera can catch a few clear
glimpses of Miss Leeds. Also
out of sight are stagehands,
who hold belching smoke pots.
RARE EDITION •
HAS BEEN FOUND
MILLBURY, Mass. — (UP)—
Apparently forgotten since
Colonial days, a dutsy first
edition of John Bunyan's "Pil-
grim's Progress" — valued at®
$1,000—was discovered recently
in the Millbury public library
cellar by Fred La Traverse, a
WPA bookbinder, while sorting
stacks of tattered tomes. _
This Curious
World r
Ferguson
MEN CAN L.IVE1 WITHIN
A RAN<3E1 OF 2.00
OF TEMPERATURE VARIATION,
BUT THEIR flODV
TEM/9£GATURES
CANNOT VARV
77t4=r/V7-y
£>BGK£ES.
NEW VORK VfXNKEES
HAD
i£"/C3*V7-
IN -EIGHT VEARS./
I90B "R? 1915
A CAKE OF
SULPHUR,
OWNED BY C, F MACLEOD,
CORNELL UNIVERSITY,
HAS 77CMCEO
L/KE A WATCH
FOR fOUR VEARS.
•*■18 com. i n r m« BMvict, inc
NO mutter what Atmospheric temperatures man can endure on
this earth, he has a small ehitnce of living if his body temperature
ever drops to 93 degrees, or rises to 110, and even to stray outside
the 97 to 101-degree range is usually a sign something is wrong.

. Sweetwater Reporter (Sweetwater, Tex.), Vol. 40, No. 325, Ed. 1 Monday, April 18, 1938. Sweetwater, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth290339/. Accessed December 28, 2014.