History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY Ot TEXAS.

cer of any State, to support the constitution of
The United States, shall have engaged in insurrection
or rebellion against the same, or given
aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But
Congress may, by a vote of two-thirds of each
house, remove such disability." The governor
maintained that the adoption of such an article
would deprive the State, for nearly a
quarter of a century, of the services of her
ablest and best men, at a time, too, when such
services are peculiarly important.
This legislature passed numerous laws for
internal improvement, and one providing an
efficient military force for the protection of
the frontier, besides many other useful laws.
Under rlhe l)an pursued by President
Johnson, State governments had by this time
been established in all the Confederate
States. 1But Congress considered that the
president had been going too fast, and established
military rule throughout the South, of
course over the veto of the president. General
Phil Sheridan was given the command
of the district including Louisiana and Texas,
and he appointed General Griffin to supervise
the latter State, with headquarters at
Galveston. To him was entrusted the reorganization
of the State, and he proceeded according
to the more stringent measures required
by the. " Radical" Congress. He
found Governor Throckmorton in his way,
and advised his removal, which was dune by
General Sheridan. Griffin added: "I cannot
find an officer holding position under the
State laws whose antecedents will justify me
in reposing trust in him in assisting in the
registration." He further stated that he had
again and again called the attention of the
governor to outrages perpetrated on Union
men, but knew of no instance in w ich the
offender had been punished. At a later date
he explains that efforts were made to exclude

Union men from the jury boxes, to prevent
which hlie issued a circular order, prescribing
a form of oath which virtually excluded every
person that had been connected with the Confederacy
from serving as a juror. This order
was seized upon by some State officials, who
attempted to make it appear that the courts
were closed by the enforcement of it.
Governor Throckmorton, of course, denied
the many slanderous attacks that had been
made upon him, and it seems that he was
really desirous of adjusting himself and the
State to the new system of reeonstruaction
adopted by Congress in opposition to President
Johnson's views.
Says Bancroft: "Early in August the
deposed governor sent in his final report of
his administration. It contains the Treas-L
urer's report, showing the receipts to have
been $626,518, and the expenses $625,192;
a statement of Indian depredations from 1865
to 1867, from which it appears that during
thIe two years 162 persons were killed, 48
carried into captivity and 24 wounded; and
hlie gave in addition a copy of his address and
the official correspondence explanatory of his
conduct. In reviewing this correspondence
Throckmorton remarks that every fair-minded
person will be satisfied that the reports of
General Griffin were made without any foundation
in fact, and were not supported by
any public or private act of his; and that the
imputation that he (Throckmorton) was an
impediment to the reconstruction of the
State showed the sinister influences which
surrounded Griffin and his proclivity to
error.
" In examining the facts Throckmorton
calls attention to the fact that he tendered
the cordial co-operation of the State authorities
to aid in the execution of the laws of
Congress; that he called upon the civil an

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 22, 2014.