History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

1iS'iORY o19 TEXAS. V

thorities for such information as would conduce
to that end; and that he advised the
people to a cheerful and prompt compliance
with the terms. But extraordinary impediments
to the proper execution of the acts of
Congress had been thrown in the way. First,
the circular order relative to jurymen's qualifications
filled the country with consternation,
impressing the minds of the people that they
were not to have the benefit of thle laws; the
oath prescribed would in fact exclude the
majority of the people, except the freedmen,
from serving as jurors; secondly, by refusing
to fill vacancies in State offices except by such
persons as could take the test oath; and
thirdly, by delay in appointing boards of
registration in many counties. Again. no
persons except those of one political party
were selected as registrars, while negroes notoriously
incompetent were appointed to act
on such boards; such persons as sextons of
cemeteries, auctioneers, members of police,
under-wardens of workhouses, school directors,
jurymen, overseers of the roads and
many other classes had been excluded from
registration; and finally a manifest disinclination
had been shown by the military authorities
to believe in the sincerity of the State
officials, and in the people when declaring
their desire to comply with the acts of Congress."

Besides the above, Mr. Throckmorton pi -
ceeds to enumerate many acts of lawlessness
and oppression on the part of the United
States agents and the military.
Elisha M. Pease became governor for the
third time in August, 1867. Public affairs,
however, had sadly changed since the happy
period of his first administration. Partisan
feeling was now bitter, and in no other of tLe
Confederate States did the work of recon

struction prove more difficult. Texas was
the last to be readmitted into the Union.
General Sheridan's military administration
gave great dissatisfaction to 1President
Johnson, and on August 26, 1867, lie was replaced
by the appointment of General Winfield
S. Hancock, whose views were very different
from those of his predecessor. lie
was unwilling to submit civil offenders to
military tribunals. IIe annulled the rigid
rules laid down by Griffin with regard to
registration of voters, instructing the local
boards to proceed according to the statutes.
But Hancock gave as little satisfaction to
Congress as his predecessor had to the president,
and the want of harmony at Washington
between the legislative and executive departments
was the occasionl of frequent
change in policy with regard to Texas, and
corresponding change of officers, and such a
state of national affairs would naturally keep
the people of Texas in an unsettled condition.
Hlancock was succeeded bly General
Reynolds.
An election was held in February, 1868,
which continued four days, for the choice of
delegates to a State constitutional convention.
At the same time 44,689 votes were cast
in favor of the convention being held, and
11,440 against it. According to the historian
Thrall, 56,678 white voters were registered
and 47,581 black ones.
June 1 following, the convention, comprising
sixty-three delegates, was held at Austin,
and organized by electing Edmund J. Davis
president, and W. V. Tunstall secretary. Although
the convention was composed of loyal
Republicans, they were divided into two factions.
General Griffin had some time before
that been petitioned to declare by military
order all acts of the Texas legislature passed
after secession null ab initio; but he died

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed December 25, 2014.