History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

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initted again to see her. Poor Bean was next
conveyed to Acapulco, one of the most sickly
places on the Pacific, and thrown into a filthy
dungeon, where no ray of the light of heaven
penetrated, and the only air admitted was
through an aperture in the base of the massive
wall, which was six feet thick! In this
foul abode his body was covered with vermin;
no one was allowed to see him, and his food
was of the coarsest and most unhealthy kind.
In his confinement his only companion was a
white lizard, which he succeeded in taming,
and which became very fond of him. The
only air hole had to be closed at night, to
prevent ingress of serpents. One night, having
neglected to close it, he was awakened by
the crawling of a monstrous serpent over his
body. His presence of mind enabled him to
lie perfectly still, until, getting hold of a
pocket-knife which he had been able to keep
concealed upon his person, he pierced the
monster in the head and escaped his fangs.
This exploit so astonished the keeper of the
prison that by his influence a petition was
sent to the governor for a mitigation of his
confinement; and that dignitary graciously
decreed that he might work in chains, and
under a guard of soldiers. Even this was a
relief.
While thus engaged his desire for freedom
again overcame his prudence. He succeeded
in freeing himself from his shackles, and with
a piece of iron killed three of the guard and
fled to the mountains. Again he was hunted
down and recaptured, nearly starved. His
cell now became his only abode, and flogging
and other indignities were heaped upon him.
Another year passed and he was again allowed
the liberty of the prison yard, under
strict surveillance.
Once more he made a desperate attempt to
escape, killing several soldiers and taking the

road to California. This time he had traveled
300 miles, when he was once more recaptured
and carried back. He was now confined upon
his back, and for weeks was almost devoured
by vermin! His appeals for mercy were
treated with mockery. But his freedom drew
nigh. The Mexican revolution of 1810 broke
out. The royalists became alarmed. They
had learned to look upon Bean as a chained
lion, and now, in the hour of their trouble,
they offered him liberty if he would join their
standard. He promised, secretly determining
that he would desert the first opportunity.
In a few days he was sent out with a scout
to reconnoitre the position of General Morelos,
the chief of the republicans. When near
the camp of that officer, Bean proposed to his
comrades that they should all join the patriots.
His persuavive eloquence was so
successful that they all agreed, and at once
reported to Morelos.
Upon the information Bean was able to
give, an attack was planned and executed
against the royalists, resulting in a complete
victory. For this Bean received a captain's
commission, and his fame spread like a prairie
fire throughout Mexico. For three years he
was the chief reliance of Morelos, and when
he fought victory followed. He was soon
conducted, with flying banners, into the town
of Acapulco, the scene of his sufferings.
The wretches who had persecuted him now
on bended knees begged for mercy, expecting
nothing but instant death. But Bean scorned
to avenge his wrongs upon them, and dismissed
them with warnings as to their future
conduct.
Three years later it was agreed that he
should go to New Orleans and obtain aid for
the republicans of Mexico. With two companions,
he made his way across the country.
On the route, while stopping a few days at

107

MISTORY OP TEXS.

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed April 24, 2014.