History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

.....--O X. 1..

to increase that effect on the mind. Where
the land is of comparatively recent formation,
the growth is of willow and cottonwood, with
occasional sycamores.
The Brazos never overflows its banks. Tlhe
water in primeval tines was slightly redder
than was that of the Ulpper Mississippi, resemnbling
that of Red river. From tlhe center
both shores show to advantage. There is
no caving-in or cut-offs, and in early days no
dead timber--scarcely a snag. The surface
of the gently-flowing water is generally calm
and beautiful, but in floods it is of course
violent and darkened with imud.
The Red river is next in importance and
forms the boundary line between Texas and
the Indian Territory and Arkansas. It has
its source in tlhe Panhandle of Texas, formerly
known as the Llano Estacado, and flows eastward
through Arkansas and Louisiana, emptying
into the Mississippi river. It drains
about 29,000 square miles in Texas. Tlhe
Big and Little Wichita rivers are among its
principal tributaries on tlhe Texas side.
The Colorado river rises in Dawson county,
the highest point reached by any of its
prongs, and flows in a southeasterly direction,
emptying into Matagorda Bay, on the Gulf
of Mexico. The Concho, San Saba, and Llano
rivers form its tributaries. It is over 900
miles long and drains a territory estimated
at 25,000 square miles.
The Trinity river has its source in Archer
and Denton counties, the two forks converging
in Dallas county and flowing in a southeasterly
direction to Trinity bay, in Chambers
county. It is about 550 miles long and
drains an area of about 17,000 square miles.
The Sabine river forms the eastern boundary
of the State from the thirty-second
parallel of latitude to the Gulf of Mexico,
anud is navigable for albut 300 miles. It has

its source in Hunt county, in the northeastern
part of the State, and drains about 17,000
square miles in Texas, emptying into Sabine
lake near thle Gulf of Mexico.
The Nueees river has its starting point ini
Ed(wards county and flows soutlheasterly into,
La Salle county, tlience east into Live ( )ak
county, andl from thence sontl, emptyinug
into (Corpus Christi bay on the (G tlf of Mexivo.
Together with its tributaries, the Leona,
Frio, and Atascosa rivers, it drains an area
estimated at about 1;,000 square miles.
The San Antonio river lias its source in
Bexar county and flows southeasterly to Reftigio
county, where it unites with the Gnadalupe
river about twelve miles north of San
Antonio bay, into which it empties. Its
principal tributaries are the Medina and
Salado rivers, in Bexar county, and the Cibolo
river, in Karnes county.
The Guadalupe river rises in Kerr county
and flows in an easterly direction to Gonza'es
county, thence in a southeasterly direction to
tlhe point of junction with the San Antonio
river, about twelve miles from its mouth on
San Antonio bay. The San Marcos river,
which has its source near San MAarcos, in
Hays county, forms its principal tributary.
The Rio Grande forms the western boundary
line of Texas and also the boundary line
between the United States and Mexico. It
has its source in the southwestern part of
Colorado and flows generally in a southeasterly
direction to Clarksville, in Carmeron
county, where it empties into the Gulf of
Mexico. It is navigable for small steamers
for about 450 miles from the Gulf, and drains
an area on the Texas side estimated at about
18,000 square miles. During the greater
part of the year it is fordable above the influence
of tide water.

11

HINTORY OF TEX.N.

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 21, 2014.