History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

115

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

cer in the Spanish army. He was a stanch
Federalist and a foe to military depotism. In
1834-'35 Navarro was a land commissioner
for Bejar district; a member of the convention
in 1836; and a member of the congress
in 1838-'39. He was condemned by Santa
Anna to imprisonment for life, though during
his captivity he was several times offered
pardon, liberty and high office if he would
abjure his native country, Texas, forever.
These propositions were rejected with scorn.
In December, 1841, just before the fall of
Santa Anna, he was removed from San Juan
de Ulua and allowed to remain a prisoner at
large in Vera Cruz, whence he escaped January
2, arriving at Galveston February 3, 1845,
after an absence of more than three years and
a half. On his return he was elected delegate
to the convention held that year to decide
upon the question of annexation, and was
afterward senator from Bejar district in tlle
State congress. He died in his native city in
1870.
GENERAL T. J. RUSK was born December
5, 1808, in South Carolina, his father being
an immigrant from Ireland and a stone mason
by occupation. Through the influence of John
C. Calhoun, on whose land the family lived,
young Rusk was placed in the office of
William Grisham, clerk for Pendleton district,
where lie made himself familiar with
the law, and was soon admitted to the bar.
He afterward removed to Clarksville, Georgia,
where he married the daughter of General
Cleveland. At that place lie acquired a
lucrative practice, but unfortunately engaged
in mining speculations and was swindled
out of nearly all his earnings. IHe pursued
some of the rascals to Texas, and found them
in this State, but they had spent or concealed
all his money. Going to Nacogdoches, he
located himself, and was afterward conspicuous

as a Texan patriot. He distinguished himself
in the w.r of independence, and subsequently
comtranded various expeditions against tlie Indians.
In 1839he was appointed chief justice
of the Reputblic, but soon resigned anl retired
into law practice at Nacogdoches. In 1845,
he was president of the aLnneation convention,
and was one of tle first two senators to
the United States Congress, and this position
lie held until his death in 1857, brought
about by his own hand, probably in a fit of
mental aberration induced by a malignant
disease and the loss of his wife. He was a
man of rare qualities, and is held in the highest
esteem by all wvho knew him. On account
of his death Congress wore the usual badge
of mourning for thirty days.
ELIShIA ANGLIN, a prominent early settler
of central Texas, was born in Powell Valley.
Virginia, where he was raised and married;
moved thence to Kentucky, afterward to Clay,
Edgar and Cole counties, Illinois, and finally,
in 1833, to Texas. He reached what is now
Grimes Prairie, Grimes county, in the fall of
1833, where Austin's colony still remained.
In the summer of 1834, inl company .with
James and Silas Parker, he visited Limestone
county in Robertson's colony, and located a
claim where the present town of Groesbeck is
situated. Silas Parker located his clai im north
of Anglin's, and James Parker went still
further north. They then returned to Grimes
Prairie, each buying a load of corn preparatory
to bringing their families, which they
did in the summer of 1834. Mr. Anglin settled
onm his claim February 1, 1835, and Fort
Parker was built in the summer of the same
year.
When the Parkers and Mr. Anglin settled
in the county the Indians were friendly and
peaceable, those then in the locality being the
Tehuacanas, at Tehuacana Hills; the Kee

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed April 18, 2015.